Referee Andre Marriner reveals his upset after sending off the wrong player last weekend

Andre Marriner

Andre Marriner

First published in Sport Basingstoke Gazette: Photograph of the Author © by

Referee Andre Marriner admits he has agonised over the blunder that saw him wrongly dismiss Arsenal defender Kieran Gibbs on Saturday, as he prepares to take charge of Saints tomorrow.

When Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain handled the ball in the penalty area in the 15th minute of the Gunners' 6-0 defeat to Chelsea at Stamford Bridge, Marriner incorrectly showed left-back Gibbs a red card.

He apologised following the game, before the Football Association rescinded the red card and decided against punishing Oxlade-Chamberlain.

Marriner will officiate the meeting between Saints and Newcastle this weekend, but admits he has analysed the mistake he made in west London ''to death'' this week.

Speaking to the Telegraph, he said: ''It knocks you for six to be honest. There's a lot of talk out there that referees make decisions, go home and don't care about it, but that's so far from the truth.

''You're continuously playing the incident over in your mind. You think about how you could've arrived at the right decision and 'what could I have done differently?'.

''You draw from all these other different sorts of aspects to try and find the reasons why you've made a mistake but equally the best thing you can do is try to park it and move on because this incident happened in the 15th minute of the game.

''Afterwards, I analysed it to death.''

The 43-year-old has received support from his colleagues within the Select Group of Referees and from the Professional Game Match Officials' Limited (PGMOL).

Ahead of his return to top-flight officiating at St Mary's on Saturday afternoon, Marriner hopes he has got his ''mojo'' back following a week to forget.

''I made a high-profile mistake last weekend but it's like a player who misses a penalty or a goalkeeper who fails to make an easy save, you want to get back out there the week after to put those demons right,'' Marriner added.

''I'm delighted by the (PGMOL) decision, it shows what my bosses think of me as a referee and hopefully I won't let them down and I'll be able to go out on Saturday and perform at my usual high standard.

''I've met all my colleagues this week, so I've received a little bit of banter from them, which has been good natured. I've been down in the dumps and it's made me smile and hopefully I've got my mojo back.''

The incident has sparked fresh calls for the introduction of video replays to the touchline, from which fourth officials could help the match referee make a more informed decision.

But Premier League chief executive Richard Scudamore believes that, because such mishaps occur so infrequently, there is no urgent need to overhaul the current application of technology.

He told Sky Sports News: ''I think there's a discussion to be had about where you can use it for purely factual matters.

''Last weekend's incident - I won't try to minimise it - was a once-in-every-23-years type of occurrence and I've never even seen a defender throw himself at a shot and make such a good save.

''It was literally so close and right behind the goalkeeper.

''The first thing is that it happens so rarely and the second is that, if one of the fourth officials had taken more time over the decision, things might have come out differently.''

Comments (5)

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10:58am Fri 28 Mar 14

Jesus_02 says...

Seems like a different sort of personality to Clatenburg. What amazes me is that there isnt room in the rules to change your mind as a ref. Also I think that Ox's red should have stood, I cant believe that intent is not included. Surely someone actually trying to cheat and prevent a goal should be punished?
Seems like a different sort of personality to Clatenburg. What amazes me is that there isnt room in the rules to change your mind as a ref. Also I think that Ox's red should have stood, I cant believe that intent is not included. Surely someone actually trying to cheat and prevent a goal should be punished? Jesus_02
  • Score: 3

11:41am Fri 28 Mar 14

justaSaintsfan says...

Television replays are so fast these days and are used to help decision making in other sports, so why not in football?

I have played and loved football for most of my life, all that time being a Saints fan. I know that referees and the other match officials generally do their best to make all their decisions honestly. But I think they need the help of technology during matches. One decision might be crucial to the result of a game. One result might be crucial to winning a title or avoiding relegation. Just one technology assisted, correct decision could ensure a club finishes slightly higher in the Premier League, thus getting more millions in place money.

The fact is that match officials are only human and human error will always happen. Technology can help to minimise mistakes, as in other sports, which doesn't take long. Without the use of tv replays, what we see are disputes between match officials and players, wasting time during games and leading to players being booked or sent off, sometimes in error. So why not embrace the available technology and get more decisions correct, as is done in top level cricket and rugby matches?

I am thinking right now of that infamous 'hand of God' incident in the World Cup, when the only people in the world who failed to see Diego Maradona's blatant hand ball were the match officials. England's chances of winning that World Cup might have looked rather different if that one, crucial decision had been got right. If modern technology can be used to catch out some of the cheating that goes on in football, as well as preventing a lot of the errors by match officials, then I'm all for it. Bring it on!!!
Television replays are so fast these days and are used to help decision making in other sports, so why not in football? I have played and loved football for most of my life, all that time being a Saints fan. I know that referees and the other match officials generally do their best to make all their decisions honestly. But I think they need the help of technology during matches. One decision might be crucial to the result of a game. One result might be crucial to winning a title or avoiding relegation. Just one technology assisted, correct decision could ensure a club finishes slightly higher in the Premier League, thus getting more millions in place money. The fact is that match officials are only human and human error will always happen. Technology can help to minimise mistakes, as in other sports, which doesn't take long. Without the use of tv replays, what we see are disputes between match officials and players, wasting time during games and leading to players being booked or sent off, sometimes in error. So why not embrace the available technology and get more decisions correct, as is done in top level cricket and rugby matches? I am thinking right now of that infamous 'hand of God' incident in the World Cup, when the only people in the world who failed to see Diego Maradona's blatant hand ball were the match officials. England's chances of winning that World Cup might have looked rather different if that one, crucial decision had been got right. If modern technology can be used to catch out some of the cheating that goes on in football, as well as preventing a lot of the errors by match officials, then I'm all for it. Bring it on!!! justaSaintsfan
  • Score: 3

12:13pm Fri 28 Mar 14

Positively4thStreet says...

justaSaintsfan wrote:
Television replays are so fast these days and are used to help decision making in other sports, so why not in football?

I have played and loved football for most of my life, all that time being a Saints fan. I know that referees and the other match officials generally do their best to make all their decisions honestly. But I think they need the help of technology during matches. One decision might be crucial to the result of a game. One result might be crucial to winning a title or avoiding relegation. Just one technology assisted, correct decision could ensure a club finishes slightly higher in the Premier League, thus getting more millions in place money.

The fact is that match officials are only human and human error will always happen. Technology can help to minimise mistakes, as in other sports, which doesn't take long. Without the use of tv replays, what we see are disputes between match officials and players, wasting time during games and leading to players being booked or sent off, sometimes in error. So why not embrace the available technology and get more decisions correct, as is done in top level cricket and rugby matches?

I am thinking right now of that infamous 'hand of God' incident in the World Cup, when the only people in the world who failed to see Diego Maradona's blatant hand ball were the match officials. England's chances of winning that World Cup might have looked rather different if that one, crucial decision had been got right. If modern technology can be used to catch out some of the cheating that goes on in football, as well as preventing a lot of the errors by match officials, then I'm all for it. Bring it on!!!
Yes I agree,the argument is that it would slow the game down,but no more than the time lost by players remonstrating now,which they wouldn't if there was technology available.
The only down side is that it might make post match analysis a tad boring on Match of the Day.
[quote][p][bold]justaSaintsfan[/bold] wrote: Television replays are so fast these days and are used to help decision making in other sports, so why not in football? I have played and loved football for most of my life, all that time being a Saints fan. I know that referees and the other match officials generally do their best to make all their decisions honestly. But I think they need the help of technology during matches. One decision might be crucial to the result of a game. One result might be crucial to winning a title or avoiding relegation. Just one technology assisted, correct decision could ensure a club finishes slightly higher in the Premier League, thus getting more millions in place money. The fact is that match officials are only human and human error will always happen. Technology can help to minimise mistakes, as in other sports, which doesn't take long. Without the use of tv replays, what we see are disputes between match officials and players, wasting time during games and leading to players being booked or sent off, sometimes in error. So why not embrace the available technology and get more decisions correct, as is done in top level cricket and rugby matches? I am thinking right now of that infamous 'hand of God' incident in the World Cup, when the only people in the world who failed to see Diego Maradona's blatant hand ball were the match officials. England's chances of winning that World Cup might have looked rather different if that one, crucial decision had been got right. If modern technology can be used to catch out some of the cheating that goes on in football, as well as preventing a lot of the errors by match officials, then I'm all for it. Bring it on!!![/p][/quote]Yes I agree,the argument is that it would slow the game down,but no more than the time lost by players remonstrating now,which they wouldn't if there was technology available. The only down side is that it might make post match analysis a tad boring on Match of the Day. Positively4thStreet
  • Score: 2

2:40pm Fri 28 Mar 14

Strasbourg Saint says...

Positively4thStreet wrote:
justaSaintsfan wrote:
Television replays are so fast these days and are used to help decision making in other sports, so why not in football?

I have played and loved football for most of my life, all that time being a Saints fan. I know that referees and the other match officials generally do their best to make all their decisions honestly. But I think they need the help of technology during matches. One decision might be crucial to the result of a game. One result might be crucial to winning a title or avoiding relegation. Just one technology assisted, correct decision could ensure a club finishes slightly higher in the Premier League, thus getting more millions in place money.

The fact is that match officials are only human and human error will always happen. Technology can help to minimise mistakes, as in other sports, which doesn't take long. Without the use of tv replays, what we see are disputes between match officials and players, wasting time during games and leading to players being booked or sent off, sometimes in error. So why not embrace the available technology and get more decisions correct, as is done in top level cricket and rugby matches?

I am thinking right now of that infamous 'hand of God' incident in the World Cup, when the only people in the world who failed to see Diego Maradona's blatant hand ball were the match officials. England's chances of winning that World Cup might have looked rather different if that one, crucial decision had been got right. If modern technology can be used to catch out some of the cheating that goes on in football, as well as preventing a lot of the errors by match officials, then I'm all for it. Bring it on!!!
Yes I agree,the argument is that it would slow the game down,but no more than the time lost by players remonstrating now,which they wouldn't if there was technology available.
The only down side is that it might make post match analysis a tad boring on Match of the Day.
Post-match analysis on MotD is already more than a tad boring.

I think the Beeb should get that Aussie comic who brilliantly presented the (alternative) Paralypics programme in 2012 to host a sort of MotD controversy programme. It would take all the controversial highlights and decide what SHOULD have happened (sendings off, offsides, penalties, red cards etc). It wouldn't be a 'knock the ref' thing - they make mistakes just like the players but might help those of us who feel the benefit of the doubt too often goes to the BIG clubs - because the reporting is so biased in their favour - believe that the refs are not going to feel pressurised into giving most things the way of the big clubs just for an easy life.

Meanwhile, I've no big problem with Marriner. He got the non-penalty at SMS right when Oscar dived for Cheatsea. Most would have missed that.
[quote][p][bold]Positively4thStreet[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]justaSaintsfan[/bold] wrote: Television replays are so fast these days and are used to help decision making in other sports, so why not in football? I have played and loved football for most of my life, all that time being a Saints fan. I know that referees and the other match officials generally do their best to make all their decisions honestly. But I think they need the help of technology during matches. One decision might be crucial to the result of a game. One result might be crucial to winning a title or avoiding relegation. Just one technology assisted, correct decision could ensure a club finishes slightly higher in the Premier League, thus getting more millions in place money. The fact is that match officials are only human and human error will always happen. Technology can help to minimise mistakes, as in other sports, which doesn't take long. Without the use of tv replays, what we see are disputes between match officials and players, wasting time during games and leading to players being booked or sent off, sometimes in error. So why not embrace the available technology and get more decisions correct, as is done in top level cricket and rugby matches? I am thinking right now of that infamous 'hand of God' incident in the World Cup, when the only people in the world who failed to see Diego Maradona's blatant hand ball were the match officials. England's chances of winning that World Cup might have looked rather different if that one, crucial decision had been got right. If modern technology can be used to catch out some of the cheating that goes on in football, as well as preventing a lot of the errors by match officials, then I'm all for it. Bring it on!!![/p][/quote]Yes I agree,the argument is that it would slow the game down,but no more than the time lost by players remonstrating now,which they wouldn't if there was technology available. The only down side is that it might make post match analysis a tad boring on Match of the Day.[/p][/quote]Post-match analysis on MotD is already more than a tad boring. I think the Beeb should get that Aussie comic who brilliantly presented the (alternative) Paralypics programme in 2012 to host a sort of MotD controversy programme. It would take all the controversial highlights and decide what SHOULD have happened (sendings off, offsides, penalties, red cards etc). It wouldn't be a 'knock the ref' thing - they make mistakes just like the players but might help those of us who feel the benefit of the doubt too often goes to the BIG clubs - because the reporting is so biased in their favour - believe that the refs are not going to feel pressurised into giving most things the way of the big clubs just for an easy life. Meanwhile, I've no big problem with Marriner. He got the non-penalty at SMS right when Oscar dived for Cheatsea. Most would have missed that. Strasbourg Saint
  • Score: 1

10:22am Sat 29 Mar 14

justaSaintsfan says...

Strasbourg Saint wrote:
Positively4thStreet wrote:
justaSaintsfan wrote:
Television replays are so fast these days and are used to help decision making in other sports, so why not in football?

I have played and loved football for most of my life, all that time being a Saints fan. I know that referees and the other match officials generally do their best to make all their decisions honestly. But I think they need the help of technology during matches. One decision might be crucial to the result of a game. One result might be crucial to winning a title or avoiding relegation. Just one technology assisted, correct decision could ensure a club finishes slightly higher in the Premier League, thus getting more millions in place money.

The fact is that match officials are only human and human error will always happen. Technology can help to minimise mistakes, as in other sports, which doesn't take long. Without the use of tv replays, what we see are disputes between match officials and players, wasting time during games and leading to players being booked or sent off, sometimes in error. So why not embrace the available technology and get more decisions correct, as is done in top level cricket and rugby matches?

I am thinking right now of that infamous 'hand of God' incident in the World Cup, when the only people in the world who failed to see Diego Maradona's blatant hand ball were the match officials. England's chances of winning that World Cup might have looked rather different if that one, crucial decision had been got right. If modern technology can be used to catch out some of the cheating that goes on in football, as well as preventing a lot of the errors by match officials, then I'm all for it. Bring it on!!!
Yes I agree,the argument is that it would slow the game down,but no more than the time lost by players remonstrating now,which they wouldn't if there was technology available.
The only down side is that it might make post match analysis a tad boring on Match of the Day.
Post-match analysis on MotD is already more than a tad boring.

I think the Beeb should get that Aussie comic who brilliantly presented the (alternative) Paralypics programme in 2012 to host a sort of MotD controversy programme. It would take all the controversial highlights and decide what SHOULD have happened (sendings off, offsides, penalties, red cards etc). It wouldn't be a 'knock the ref' thing - they make mistakes just like the players but might help those of us who feel the benefit of the doubt too often goes to the BIG clubs - because the reporting is so biased in their favour - believe that the refs are not going to feel pressurised into giving most things the way of the big clubs just for an easy life.

Meanwhile, I've no big problem with Marriner. He got the non-penalty at SMS right when Oscar dived for Cheatsea. Most would have missed that.
Spot on!

I like the idea of using technology for helping referees and for showing up players who blatantly cheat, such as the then so called best player in the world, the 'grate' Diego Maradona. He never did fit the profile for greatness . . . . . . . merely 'grateness!' Perhaps a MotD controversy programme might be used to humourously ridicule such things as that awful 'hand of God' incident, which is still offensive to both football and religion!
[quote][p][bold]Strasbourg Saint[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Positively4thStreet[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]justaSaintsfan[/bold] wrote: Television replays are so fast these days and are used to help decision making in other sports, so why not in football? I have played and loved football for most of my life, all that time being a Saints fan. I know that referees and the other match officials generally do their best to make all their decisions honestly. But I think they need the help of technology during matches. One decision might be crucial to the result of a game. One result might be crucial to winning a title or avoiding relegation. Just one technology assisted, correct decision could ensure a club finishes slightly higher in the Premier League, thus getting more millions in place money. The fact is that match officials are only human and human error will always happen. Technology can help to minimise mistakes, as in other sports, which doesn't take long. Without the use of tv replays, what we see are disputes between match officials and players, wasting time during games and leading to players being booked or sent off, sometimes in error. So why not embrace the available technology and get more decisions correct, as is done in top level cricket and rugby matches? I am thinking right now of that infamous 'hand of God' incident in the World Cup, when the only people in the world who failed to see Diego Maradona's blatant hand ball were the match officials. England's chances of winning that World Cup might have looked rather different if that one, crucial decision had been got right. If modern technology can be used to catch out some of the cheating that goes on in football, as well as preventing a lot of the errors by match officials, then I'm all for it. Bring it on!!![/p][/quote]Yes I agree,the argument is that it would slow the game down,but no more than the time lost by players remonstrating now,which they wouldn't if there was technology available. The only down side is that it might make post match analysis a tad boring on Match of the Day.[/p][/quote]Post-match analysis on MotD is already more than a tad boring. I think the Beeb should get that Aussie comic who brilliantly presented the (alternative) Paralypics programme in 2012 to host a sort of MotD controversy programme. It would take all the controversial highlights and decide what SHOULD have happened (sendings off, offsides, penalties, red cards etc). It wouldn't be a 'knock the ref' thing - they make mistakes just like the players but might help those of us who feel the benefit of the doubt too often goes to the BIG clubs - because the reporting is so biased in their favour - believe that the refs are not going to feel pressurised into giving most things the way of the big clubs just for an easy life. Meanwhile, I've no big problem with Marriner. He got the non-penalty at SMS right when Oscar dived for Cheatsea. Most would have missed that.[/p][/quote]Spot on! I like the idea of using technology for helping referees and for showing up players who blatantly cheat, such as the then so called best player in the world, the 'grate' Diego Maradona. He never did fit the profile for greatness . . . . . . . merely 'grateness!' Perhaps a MotD controversy programme might be used to humourously ridicule such things as that awful 'hand of God' incident, which is still offensive to both football and religion! justaSaintsfan
  • Score: 3

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