Councillor believes dead crows were dumped in Hound Green

Pile of dead crows found in ditch

Pile of dead crows found in ditch

First published in News by , Senior Reporter

A PILE of dead crows were found in a ditch in a north Hampshire village – and a parish councillor believes they may have been dumped.

The gruesome discovery in Vicarage Lane, Hound Green, was made by the parents of Councillor Doug Wheeler, the chairman of Mattingley Parish Council, while they walked their dog.

He visited the site not long after on the morning of Friday, July 4, and saw the remains of around 40 birds.

Cllr Wheeler said: “The smell was overpowering and it nearly made me physically sick. I imagine they would have there for a few days.

“I made a few phone calls to Hart and they responded quickly and some poor individual had to clear it up.”

Cllr Wheeler believes that the birds were killed somewhere else and then dumped in the ditch.

He said he called friends on nearby farms but no-one had heard of the matter.

Cllr Wheeler added: “I understand that crows and rooks and pests have to be controlled on farmland. If you shoot them, you should dispose of them properly. You do not fly-tip them on the side of the road for some individual to clear them up.

“This has to be paid for by Hart District Council and that will reflect on us all in the long run, having to pay for someone’s irresponsible behaviour.”

The street care team at Hart cleared up the mess on the day it was reported.

John Elson, head of technical and environmental services, said: “Because of the large number of dead birds, the request was dealt with urgently.”

Comments (11)

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12:08pm Sat 19 Jul 14

radders19 says...

I guess he is right as it is unlikely 40 birds all died at the same spot.
I guess he is right as it is unlikely 40 birds all died at the same spot. radders19
  • Score: 1

7:42pm Sat 19 Jul 14

sonobuoy says...

Maybe it was a suicide pact.
Maybe it was a suicide pact. sonobuoy
  • Score: 7

12:36pm Sun 20 Jul 14

CineEngineer says...

One of the 40 wasn't called Miller by any chance? That would have been a blessing in disguise!
One of the 40 wasn't called Miller by any chance? That would have been a blessing in disguise! CineEngineer
  • Score: 0

8:38pm Sun 20 Jul 14

deepinsight says...

A rook on its own is a crow; a crow in a crowd is a rook.

But 40 birds in a ditch, callous.
A rook on its own is a crow; a crow in a crowd is a rook. But 40 birds in a ditch, callous. deepinsight
  • Score: 2

9:42am Mon 21 Jul 14

JJ38JJ says...

How appropriate in this instance is the collective noun for crows?
How appropriate in this instance is the collective noun for crows? JJ38JJ
  • Score: 2

1:24pm Mon 21 Jul 14

CrossofLorraine says...

This reminds me that last year researchers at Defra investigated over 50 dead crows found beside a road in Greater Manchester, and there was concern that they may have died from Avian flu. A Bird Pathologist examined the remains of all the crows, and, to everyone's relief, confirmed the problem was definitely NOT Avian flu. The cause of death appeared to be vehicular impacts.
However, during the detailed analysis it was noted that varying colours of paints appeared on the bird's beaks and claws – but the most common colour was white. By analyzing these paint residues it was determined that 98% of the crows had been killed by impact with vans, while only 2% were killed by an impact with a car.
Defra then hired an Ornithological Behaviorist to determine if there was a cause for the disproportionate percentages of truck kills versus car kills.
The Ornithological Behaviorist very quickly concluded the cause: when crows eat road kill, they always have a look-out crow in a nearby tree to warn of impending danger.
The scientific conclusion was that while all the lookout crows could say "Caw", none could say "Van."!
This reminds me that last year researchers at Defra investigated over 50 dead crows found beside a road in Greater Manchester, and there was concern that they may have died from Avian flu. A Bird Pathologist examined the remains of all the crows, and, to everyone's relief, confirmed the problem was definitely NOT Avian flu. The cause of death appeared to be vehicular impacts. However, during the detailed analysis it was noted that varying colours of paints appeared on the bird's beaks and claws – but the most common colour was white. By analyzing these paint residues it was determined that 98% of the crows had been killed by impact with vans, while only 2% were killed by an impact with a car. Defra then hired an Ornithological Behaviorist to determine if there was a cause for the disproportionate percentages of truck kills versus car kills. The Ornithological Behaviorist very quickly concluded the cause: when crows eat road kill, they always have a look-out crow in a nearby tree to warn of impending danger. The scientific conclusion was that while all the lookout crows could say "Caw", none could say "Van."! CrossofLorraine
  • Score: 15

12:23pm Tue 22 Jul 14

ManWithavan says...

Bake them all in a pie.....
Bake them all in a pie..... ManWithavan
  • Score: 2

12:53pm Tue 22 Jul 14

robertspet8 says...

ManWithavan wrote:
Bake them all in a pie.....
Two pies, leaving two black birds.
[quote][p][bold]ManWithavan[/bold] wrote: Bake them all in a pie.....[/p][/quote]Two pies, leaving two black birds. robertspet8
  • Score: 2

11:50am Wed 23 Jul 14

Sam_Walker123456 says...

Cllr Wheeler added: “I understand that crows and rooks and pests have to be controlled on farmland. If you shoot them, you should dispose of them properly. You do not fly-tip them on the side of the road for some individual to clear them up. "
Corvids (rooks, crows, magpies, etc) are protected by law. If a farmer wishes to kill or trap them to protect crops he has to apply for a licence and the work has to be carried out in the proper way. So any farmer who has gone to the trouble of obtaining a licence and employing the right people to do the job is unlikely to dump the bodies in a ditch. No, these birds have been shot or poisoned illegally.
Cllr Wheeler added: “I understand that crows and rooks and pests have to be controlled on farmland. If you shoot them, you should dispose of them properly. You do not fly-tip them on the side of the road for some individual to clear them up. " Corvids (rooks, crows, magpies, etc) are protected by law. If a farmer wishes to kill or trap them to protect crops he has to apply for a licence and the work has to be carried out in the proper way. So any farmer who has gone to the trouble of obtaining a licence and employing the right people to do the job is unlikely to dump the bodies in a ditch. No, these birds have been shot or poisoned illegally. Sam_Walker123456
  • Score: 5

5:38pm Wed 23 Jul 14

adiebb says...

People north of 'The Wall' always think a dead Crow is a good thing, let alone 40!

Yes, I'm a Game of Thrones fan
People north of 'The Wall' always think a dead Crow is a good thing, let alone 40! Yes, I'm a Game of Thrones fan adiebb
  • Score: 3

9:15am Fri 25 Jul 14

Folkestone Saint says...

Only just had my eyes checked but I think I need it doing again, I thought it said cow's, I wish it were the local gull's though, then I might get some sleep.
Only just had my eyes checked but I think I need it doing again, I thought it said cow's, I wish it were the local gull's though, then I might get some sleep. Folkestone Saint
  • Score: 0

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