Energy company set to appeal after wind farm plan is rejected

An artist's impression of how the wind farm would look from Wayfarers Walk at Breach Farm, Wayfarers Walk, at Dummer

An artist's impression of how the wind farm would look from Wayfarers Walk at Breach Farm, Wayfarers Walk, at Dummer

First published in News by , Reporter

A COMPANY behind plans for a six-turbine wind farm near Basingstoke is set to mount an appeal after Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council gave the scheme the thumbs down.

TCI Renewables applied to the borough council for full planning permission to erect the group of 130-metre-high turbines on land at Woodmancott Down, between Dummer and Micheldever, in June 2013.

Councillors on the borough council’s development control committee voted to support planning officers’ recommendation for refusal because of the impact the development would have on ecology, the landscape, nearby conservation areas and the safety of operations at Lasham Airfield.

However, Bruce Hutt, finance director at TCI Renewables, has warned the fight is not over, and told The Gazette that the firm would appeal the decision.

Mr Hutt spoke in favour of the wind farm at last Wednesday’s meeting, saying the development would generate power to 11,000 homes.

He said: “There is limited impact to residents, limited impact to views, and limited impact on heritage assets, aviation and the Chilbolton Observatory. It is right that smaller effects are outweighed by the substantial benefits the scheme would bring.”

Jonathon Moseley, a member of the Save Our Scenic Hampshire Downs (SOSH) campaign group, spoke against the application, saying: “All of us understand the need for renewable energy but the wind turbines are not appropriate to the environment where they will be sited.

“This is not a windy site. These turbines are not sustainable, environmentally or socially.”

Councillor Diane Taylor, Conservative member for Oakley and North Waltham, moved a motion to reject the application, telling councillors that it was one of the “most impacting” applications she had dealt with on the committee.

She added: “This cannot be an acceptable impact in my view. When you get people going on a walk, they are going to get half way along and say ‘there are wind turbines, we must be in Basingstoke’ – but I don’t want that to happen.”

Labour councillors David Potter, Michael Westbrook and George Hood, and Liberal Democrat councillor Michael Bound were the only members of the 12-strong committee to vote in favour of the application.

Comments (11)

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2:06pm Mon 7 Jul 14

laurence86 says...

I actually think that the giant turbines actually look rather majestic. That said I think that the way forward is actually to have all homes generating their own power. If you covered every available roof surface in the UK with solar panels the energy output could power Europe. Start by making them compulsory on new builds, and offer subsides for retro fitting them to older houses.
I actually think that the giant turbines actually look rather majestic. That said I think that the way forward is actually to have all homes generating their own power. If you covered every available roof surface in the UK with solar panels the energy output could power Europe. Start by making them compulsory on new builds, and offer subsides for retro fitting them to older houses. laurence86
  • Score: 7

2:51pm Tue 8 Jul 14

saxcu@imgof.com says...

there are different problems involved - the shallow thinking of the people too scared of "scary turbines that will ruin their views" but not scared to face higher and higher energy bills every year, in the other hand when this company will build these turbines the electricity will be offered at open market price (e.g. it will not be cheaper for consumers).

Any personal solar systems and wind turbines are too expensive and too inefficient compared to a proper industrial scale efficiency - there is not a single reason to cover every roof in UK with solar panels - it is just impossible to average 400 kwh per month per average roof area (event not close it this figure).

It is requires government to be involved - either the government itself should build its own turbines to reduce its own costs or to change legislation\pricing policy for the "green" energy in favor of final customers, not energy companies.
there are different problems involved - the shallow thinking of the people too scared of "scary turbines that will ruin their views" but not scared to face higher and higher energy bills every year, in the other hand when this company will build these turbines the electricity will be offered at open market price (e.g. it will not be cheaper for consumers). Any personal solar systems and wind turbines are too expensive and too inefficient compared to a proper industrial scale efficiency - there is not a single reason to cover every roof in UK with solar panels - it is just impossible to average 400 kwh per month per average roof area (event not close it this figure). It is requires government to be involved - either the government itself should build its own turbines to reduce its own costs or to change legislation\pricing policy for the "green" energy in favor of final customers, not energy companies. saxcu@imgof.com
  • Score: 0

4:11pm Tue 8 Jul 14

JJ38JJ says...

laurence86 wrote:
I actually think that the giant turbines actually look rather majestic. That said I think that the way forward is actually to have all homes generating their own power. If you covered every available roof surface in the UK with solar panels the energy output could power Europe. Start by making them compulsory on new builds, and offer subsides for retro fitting them to older houses.
I'm amazed that companies that operate large warehouse or supermarket scale buildings don't get in the act. Put a solar farm in a field and the locals object. Put in on the roof of Tescos and no one will know it's there.
Besides relying on the sun on it's own doesn't make sense. For sustainable energy to be a real alternative to fossil fuels we need to cover all the bases: wind, sun, tide and hydroelectric.
[quote][p][bold]laurence86[/bold] wrote: I actually think that the giant turbines actually look rather majestic. That said I think that the way forward is actually to have all homes generating their own power. If you covered every available roof surface in the UK with solar panels the energy output could power Europe. Start by making them compulsory on new builds, and offer subsides for retro fitting them to older houses.[/p][/quote]I'm amazed that companies that operate large warehouse or supermarket scale buildings don't get in the act. Put a solar farm in a field and the locals object. Put in on the roof of Tescos and no one will know it's there. Besides relying on the sun on it's own doesn't make sense. For sustainable energy to be a real alternative to fossil fuels we need to cover all the bases: wind, sun, tide and hydroelectric. JJ38JJ
  • Score: 9

4:31pm Tue 8 Jul 14

laurence86 says...

Solar panel prices are kept high because the EU has banned cheap Chinese imports to protect European manufactures. Changes at the point of manufacture a can make a big difference in the future. A good example would be pollution, by making it compulsory for car manufactures to fit all cars with catalytic convertors and setting rules on CO2 output. We now have better quality air in city’s than we used to. I’m not suggesting that house builders only use solar panels, there are lots of green tools that can be used to reduce the amount of fossil fuel a house needs on a day to day basis.

It all comes down to money. Politicians want to skim what they can, EU manufactures still want to charge us full price for equipment, big house building companies still want to build identical shoeboxes that maximise profit and energy companies want to hang on to their monopoly.
Solar panel prices are kept high because the EU has banned cheap Chinese imports to protect European manufactures. Changes at the point of manufacture a can make a big difference in the future. A good example would be pollution, by making it compulsory for car manufactures to fit all cars with catalytic convertors and setting rules on CO2 output. We now have better quality air in city’s than we used to. I’m not suggesting that house builders only use solar panels, there are lots of green tools that can be used to reduce the amount of fossil fuel a house needs on a day to day basis. It all comes down to money. Politicians want to skim what they can, EU manufactures still want to charge us full price for equipment, big house building companies still want to build identical shoeboxes that maximise profit and energy companies want to hang on to their monopoly. laurence86
  • Score: 2

4:34pm Tue 8 Jul 14

laurence86 says...

I’m not convinced on the figures but here are some example of ways a house could be less reliant on the grid.

http://www.rereos.co
m/infographics/home-
makes-money
I’m not convinced on the figures but here are some example of ways a house could be less reliant on the grid. http://www.rereos.co m/infographics/home- makes-money laurence86
  • Score: 0

4:36pm Tue 8 Jul 14

laurence86 says...

JJ38JJ wrote:
laurence86 wrote:
I actually think that the giant turbines actually look rather majestic. That said I think that the way forward is actually to have all homes generating their own power. If you covered every available roof surface in the UK with solar panels the energy output could power Europe. Start by making them compulsory on new builds, and offer subsides for retro fitting them to older houses.
I'm amazed that companies that operate large warehouse or supermarket scale buildings don't get in the act. Put a solar farm in a field and the locals object. Put in on the roof of Tescos and no one will know it's there.
Besides relying on the sun on it's own doesn't make sense. For sustainable energy to be a real alternative to fossil fuels we need to cover all the bases: wind, sun, tide and hydroelectric.
They are on it already:

http://www.environme
ntalleader.com/2011/
03/24/tesco-installs
-3-2mw-of-wind-turbi
nes-at-distribution-
centers/
[quote][p][bold]JJ38JJ[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]laurence86[/bold] wrote: I actually think that the giant turbines actually look rather majestic. That said I think that the way forward is actually to have all homes generating their own power. If you covered every available roof surface in the UK with solar panels the energy output could power Europe. Start by making them compulsory on new builds, and offer subsides for retro fitting them to older houses.[/p][/quote]I'm amazed that companies that operate large warehouse or supermarket scale buildings don't get in the act. Put a solar farm in a field and the locals object. Put in on the roof of Tescos and no one will know it's there. Besides relying on the sun on it's own doesn't make sense. For sustainable energy to be a real alternative to fossil fuels we need to cover all the bases: wind, sun, tide and hydroelectric.[/p][/quote]They are on it already: http://www.environme ntalleader.com/2011/ 03/24/tesco-installs -3-2mw-of-wind-turbi nes-at-distribution- centers/ laurence86
  • Score: 0

11:00pm Tue 8 Jul 14

Cynical Reader says...

So what do we do on a calm, dark night ? No sun, no wind, no waves, no power.
So what do we do on a calm, dark night ? No sun, no wind, no waves, no power. Cynical Reader
  • Score: -2

9:24am Wed 9 Jul 14

laurence86 says...

Cynical Reader wrote:
So what do we do on a calm, dark night ? No sun, no wind, no waves, no power.
Really? For a start tides don’t go away, geothermic power doesn’t go away, waste for waste to energy solutions won’t go away and bio-fuel won’t go away. Power stations won’t be going anywhere for a long time but it would be good if we could begin to wean ourselves off of fossil fuels now so that in 30 or 50 years time we are not dependant on it and the countries/companies that control it.
[quote][p][bold]Cynical Reader[/bold] wrote: So what do we do on a calm, dark night ? No sun, no wind, no waves, no power.[/p][/quote]Really? For a start tides don’t go away, geothermic power doesn’t go away, waste for waste to energy solutions won’t go away and bio-fuel won’t go away. Power stations won’t be going anywhere for a long time but it would be good if we could begin to wean ourselves off of fossil fuels now so that in 30 or 50 years time we are not dependant on it and the countries/companies that control it. laurence86
  • Score: 3

10:07am Wed 9 Jul 14

JJ38JJ says...

Cynical Reader wrote:
So what do we do on a calm, dark night ? No sun, no wind, no waves, no power.
Google 'capacitor' then think big. It's not rocket science.
[quote][p][bold]Cynical Reader[/bold] wrote: So what do we do on a calm, dark night ? No sun, no wind, no waves, no power.[/p][/quote]Google 'capacitor' then think big. It's not rocket science. JJ38JJ
  • Score: 1

11:59am Wed 9 Jul 14

Cynical Reader says...

Laurence - agreed, but I was referring to the wind and solar cheap (?) non-solutions.
JJ - we also have stored water, like Llanberis,, but the capacity needed is mind-boggling, and who will pay for it - one guess!
Laurence - agreed, but I was referring to the wind and solar cheap (?) non-solutions. JJ - we also have stored water, like Llanberis,, but the capacity needed is mind-boggling, and who will pay for it - one guess! Cynical Reader
  • Score: -1

10:58pm Sat 12 Jul 14

shame says...

Today i drove from filey to basingstoke and saw many of these monstrosities and not one did i see turning

The two things i would like to know are: is there a manufacturer of theese eyesores in England and any on the parent compaines English
Today i drove from filey to basingstoke and saw many of these monstrosities and not one did i see turning The two things i would like to know are: is there a manufacturer of theese eyesores in England and any on the parent compaines English shame
  • Score: 0

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