Equine training and livery yard set up near Winchester

Lucy Morgans, owner of Equine Intelligence, at Homestead Farm in Houghton, set up the new practice offering training sessions.

Lucy Morgans, owner of Equine Intelligence, at Homestead Farm in Houghton, set up the new practice offering training sessions.

First published in News Basingstoke Gazette: Photograph of the Author by , Reporter

A NEW equine training and livery yard has been set up near Stockbridge to help owners better relationships with their steeds.

Lucy Morgans, owner of Equine Intelligence, at Homestead Farm in Houghton, set up the new practice offering training sessions for both horses, and their owners, in order to better their behaviour.

The horse agility trainer started the business after her own experiences with a rescue horse, 12-year-old Shamrock, pushed her knowledge and patience to the limits but Ms Morgans said it was all worth it in the end.

“I came across Intelligent Horsemanship’s Kelly Marks, after I brought my mare Shamrock,” Ms Morgans said. “Shamrock was a bit of a rescue and had been through four homes in six months. She was only four and was a very frightened horse that had been misunderstood.

“I soon found out Shamrock had endured some of the worst kinds of treatment, which had made her so fearful that she had become dangerous to be around and handle. I have been involved with horses since the age of eight, but had no idea how to get through to Shamrock, to comfort and make her feel safe.

“In hindsight I truly believe Shamrock came to me as my teacher, she taught me how to listen, encouraged me to learn more, let me know when I got things wrong and when I got things right.”

Ms Morgans said her relationship with Shamrock led her to teach others about interaction with horses after working with American horse whisperer Monty Roberts.

“I knew this was the way I wanted to spend my life, working with horses was my passion, and a way of life rather than just a career,” she added. “Spreading the word and showing there is a different way, a kind way, a way to help a large, frightened, powerful flight animal to settle and accept human contact, to want to interact, to give back and show people that when the horse understands what you’re asking they will give you the world.

“Teaching people and training horses has been the most rewarding and satisfying thing in my life. Watching people succeed with and enjoy their horses, to me is priceless.”

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