Drug addict grew cannabis at his Basingstoke home

Drug addict grew cannabis at his Basingstoke home

Drug addict grew cannabis at his Basingstoke home

First published in News by , Senior Reporter

A DRUG addict, who ran a “sophisticated operation” producing thousands of pounds worth of cannabis at his Basingstoke home, has been handed a suspended prison sentence.

Winchester Crown Court heard how Michael Marley was arrested by officers acting on a tip-off earlier this year.

Police officers discovered two of the three bedrooms in his Pershore Road home were being used to grow the drug on March 1. They found 37 plants along with equipment including lighting and scales, as well as £315 in cash.

Marley, 55, was arrested and bailed, but the equipment was not removed by the police.

When they returned to the address on April 24, they found that Marley had set up the equipment once more and had cultivated a further 20 plants.

Prosecuting, Rob Welling said: “This time they put the whole set-up in a skip – they did not have one with them on the first occasion.”

Mr Welling said the total estimated street value of the drugs was around £7,500.

Marley pleaded guilty to two counts of production of cannabis, and one charge of possession of cocaine, which related to a small amount of the drug found by the police at his address during their first visit.

Defending Marley, Stuart Western said he had grown the drug to feed and fund his own habit.

He said: “He accepts he had a considerable cannabis problem himself. He accepts he was selling some of that cannabis to fund his own habit.”

He added his client suffered from a number of health problems, including Hepatitis C, sciatica, fibrosis, cirrhosis, pancreatitis and peritonitis, adding that he has no teeth and also has problems with alcohol.

He said that Marley had been “tearful and fearful” before being sentenced and was still depressed about his break-up with a long-term partner ten years ago.

Sentencing Marley, Judge Advocate General Robert Hill described the cultivation of the cannabis as a “sophisticated operation”, and said the fact he had carried on doing it while on police bail was an aggravating feature of the offence.

He sentenced Marley to a total of four months imprisonment, suspended for two years, and a supervision order.

Marley was also told to pay a victim surcharge of £80.

Comments (12)

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3:31pm Tue 29 Jul 14

laurence86 says...

Yet again, another addict let off with slap on the wrist. When will the judges realise that if you actually enforce a prison sentence you give them a better chance at beating the addiction.
Yet again, another addict let off with slap on the wrist. When will the judges realise that if you actually enforce a prison sentence you give them a better chance at beating the addiction. laurence86
  • Score: -4

4:22pm Tue 29 Jul 14

dnoejr says...

Yet again more tax payers money being wasted enforcing out of date proabition law , who is the victim in this crime ? If cannabis was taxed like truly dangerous drugs that actually kill hundreds if not thousands a year (tabaco, alcohol,)
Yet again more tax payers money being wasted enforcing out of date proabition law , who is the victim in this crime ? If cannabis was taxed like truly dangerous drugs that actually kill hundreds if not thousands a year (tabaco, alcohol,) dnoejr
  • Score: 7

8:08pm Tue 29 Jul 14

Mr_Right says...

laurence86 wrote:
Yet again, another addict let off with slap on the wrist. When will the judges realise that if you actually enforce a prison sentence you give them a better chance at beating the addiction.
Really? you really think a prison sentence would cure someone of an addiction? Or is it more likely that fraternising with criminals and potentially preventing any chance of future employment would lead to a life of more serious crime?

Surely where there is no significant risk to the public (as defined by probation officers, who complete pre-sentence reports) suspended sentences, or conditional discharges, are more appropriate to ensure people get the help they need to beat their addictions whilst making efforts to rehabilitate and contribute to society.
[quote][p][bold]laurence86[/bold] wrote: Yet again, another addict let off with slap on the wrist. When will the judges realise that if you actually enforce a prison sentence you give them a better chance at beating the addiction.[/p][/quote]Really? you really think a prison sentence would cure someone of an addiction? Or is it more likely that fraternising with criminals and potentially preventing any chance of future employment would lead to a life of more serious crime? Surely where there is no significant risk to the public (as defined by probation officers, who complete pre-sentence reports) suspended sentences, or conditional discharges, are more appropriate to ensure people get the help they need to beat their addictions whilst making efforts to rehabilitate and contribute to society. Mr_Right
  • Score: 8

9:45am Wed 30 Jul 14

laurence86 says...

Mr_Right wrote:
laurence86 wrote:
Yet again, another addict let off with slap on the wrist. When will the judges realise that if you actually enforce a prison sentence you give them a better chance at beating the addiction.
Really? you really think a prison sentence would cure someone of an addiction? Or is it more likely that fraternising with criminals and potentially preventing any chance of future employment would lead to a life of more serious crime?

Surely where there is no significant risk to the public (as defined by probation officers, who complete pre-sentence reports) suspended sentences, or conditional discharges, are more appropriate to ensure people get the help they need to beat their addictions whilst making efforts to rehabilitate and contribute to society.
I believe that a prison sentence would isolate him from the drugs, alcohol and associates who give him negative reinforcement as well as giving him access to counsellors who could help him. Clearly he couldn’t make ends meet before, releasing him is going to put straight back into the same situation that caused him to start a cannabis factory. He has already been caught twice growing cannabis in the space of nine weeks. As for future employment, both the suspended sentence and a prison sentence will be on his record, and he is not going to be able to get a job for the next two years with a suspended sentence hanging over his head.
[quote][p][bold]Mr_Right[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]laurence86[/bold] wrote: Yet again, another addict let off with slap on the wrist. When will the judges realise that if you actually enforce a prison sentence you give them a better chance at beating the addiction.[/p][/quote]Really? you really think a prison sentence would cure someone of an addiction? Or is it more likely that fraternising with criminals and potentially preventing any chance of future employment would lead to a life of more serious crime? Surely where there is no significant risk to the public (as defined by probation officers, who complete pre-sentence reports) suspended sentences, or conditional discharges, are more appropriate to ensure people get the help they need to beat their addictions whilst making efforts to rehabilitate and contribute to society.[/p][/quote]I believe that a prison sentence would isolate him from the drugs, alcohol and associates who give him negative reinforcement as well as giving him access to counsellors who could help him. Clearly he couldn’t make ends meet before, releasing him is going to put straight back into the same situation that caused him to start a cannabis factory. He has already been caught twice growing cannabis in the space of nine weeks. As for future employment, both the suspended sentence and a prison sentence will be on his record, and he is not going to be able to get a job for the next two years with a suspended sentence hanging over his head. laurence86
  • Score: -3

10:57am Wed 30 Jul 14

JJ38JJ says...

I thought cannabis wasn't addictive? I don't disagree that it should be decriminalised but it kind of weakens his defence.
I thought cannabis wasn't addictive? I don't disagree that it should be decriminalised but it kind of weakens his defence. JJ38JJ
  • Score: -2

12:14pm Wed 30 Jul 14

jonone says...

JJ38JJ wrote:
I thought cannabis wasn't addictive? I don't disagree that it should be decriminalised but it kind of weakens his defence.
It isn't addictive, only people with staggeringly low will power get addicted to things like cannabis, tobacco etc.
[quote][p][bold]JJ38JJ[/bold] wrote: I thought cannabis wasn't addictive? I don't disagree that it should be decriminalised but it kind of weakens his defence.[/p][/quote]It isn't addictive, only people with staggeringly low will power get addicted to things like cannabis, tobacco etc. jonone
  • Score: -13

1:35pm Wed 30 Jul 14

Peter H. says...

We banned drugs and in doing so handed control of their sale over to criminal gangs and terrorist groups who care nothing about the age or welfare of users. They have made billions from it, whilst we have spent billions more trying to contain their distribution.

Our punitive approach makes drugs hugely profitable, dealers become rich while addicts turn to crime to feed their habit (usually shoplifting, burglary and mugging). As a result we all become victims, through higher prices in the shops and increased insurance premiums. On top of that we spend millions more in jailing people.

For over fifty years our ‘war on drugs’ has continued with no sign of it being won, yet if we legalised, controlled and taxed them, these gangs and pushers would be out of business tomorrow. Instead of giving money to these criminals, it could be spent on harm reduction, enabling education and treatment. Addicts would have a chance to lead near normal lives without resorting to crime and we would save billions in tax in the process.

Unfortunately we seem too timid to even think about such alternatives, preferring instead to pretend we are being ‘tough on drugs’ while in truth pouring money into cartels and terrorists.
We banned drugs and in doing so handed control of their sale over to criminal gangs and terrorist groups who care nothing about the age or welfare of users. They have made billions from it, whilst we have spent billions more trying to contain their distribution. Our punitive approach makes drugs hugely profitable, dealers become rich while addicts turn to crime to feed their habit (usually shoplifting, burglary and mugging). As a result we all become victims, through higher prices in the shops and increased insurance premiums. On top of that we spend millions more in jailing people. For over fifty years our ‘war on drugs’ has continued with no sign of it being won, yet if we legalised, controlled and taxed them, these gangs and pushers would be out of business tomorrow. Instead of giving money to these criminals, it could be spent on harm reduction, enabling education and treatment. Addicts would have a chance to lead near normal lives without resorting to crime and we would save billions in tax in the process. Unfortunately we seem too timid to even think about such alternatives, preferring instead to pretend we are being ‘tough on drugs’ while in truth pouring money into cartels and terrorists. Peter H.
  • Score: 14

1:49pm Wed 30 Jul 14

Sam_Walker123456 says...

dnoejr wrote:
Yet again more tax payers money being wasted enforcing out of date proabition law , who is the victim in this crime ? If cannabis was taxed like truly dangerous drugs that actually kill hundreds if not thousands a year (tabaco, alcohol,)
Here is a possible solution - legalise cannabis. Then Michael Marley will be able to build a legimate career as a cannabis farmer, pay tax and become a contributor to, rather than a drain on, society. Win, win!!
As for Alcohol and Tobacco, tax them enough to cover what they cost society. And I mean the full cost of everything: medical care; benefits claimed because too ill to work; tax not paid because too ill to work; loss to employer because too ill to work; cost of policing drink/tobacco related problems; etc. Apply the same tax to cannabis and then we can see which of the three is causing the most harm to society.
[quote][p][bold]dnoejr[/bold] wrote: Yet again more tax payers money being wasted enforcing out of date proabition law , who is the victim in this crime ? If cannabis was taxed like truly dangerous drugs that actually kill hundreds if not thousands a year (tabaco, alcohol,)[/p][/quote]Here is a possible solution - legalise cannabis. Then Michael Marley will be able to build a legimate career as a cannabis farmer, pay tax and become a contributor to, rather than a drain on, society. Win, win!! As for Alcohol and Tobacco, tax them enough to cover what they cost society. And I mean the full cost of everything: medical care; benefits claimed because too ill to work; tax not paid because too ill to work; loss to employer because too ill to work; cost of policing drink/tobacco related problems; etc. Apply the same tax to cannabis and then we can see which of the three is causing the most harm to society. Sam_Walker123456
  • Score: 3

1:12pm Thu 31 Jul 14

Peter H. says...

Legalisation is the way to go, but any politician suggesting it would probably be eviscerated by the tabloids and middle England.

The compromise so far has been decriminalisation which is actually the worst of both worlds, money still goes to criminals but we still pay for the consequences.
Legalisation is the way to go, but any politician suggesting it would probably be eviscerated by the tabloids and middle England. The compromise so far has been decriminalisation which is actually the worst of both worlds, money still goes to criminals but we still pay for the consequences. Peter H.
  • Score: 4

4:16pm Thu 31 Jul 14

deepinsight says...

Well, considering that one can purchase cannabis seeds from strong strains at the price of 5 for £35 in a shop in Basingstoke, apply heat, light and water and sell the resultant plants for £375 ( £7,500 worth of drugs divided by 20 plants) it's not difficult to see why growers grow is it?
Well, considering that one can purchase cannabis seeds from strong strains at the price of 5 for £35 in a shop in Basingstoke, apply heat, light and water and sell the resultant plants for £375 ( £7,500 worth of drugs divided by 20 plants) it's not difficult to see why growers grow is it? deepinsight
  • Score: -1

3:09pm Fri 1 Aug 14

Town Guard says...

"who is the victim in this crime ? If cannabis was taxed like truly dangerous drugs that actually kill hundreds if not thousands a year (tabaco, alcohol,"

Well whatever the arguments about legalisation, lets not pretend canabis is harmless. Here is a man with no teeth, an addiction to canabis, and a string of health problems related to drug and alcohol abuse - inluding Hepatitis C and cirrhosis. He problably incapable of holding down a job, even if anyone would offer him one.

Who are the victims ? Apart from addicts themselves there are their families, their partners, the children, their parents, their work collegues,
who suffer neglect, bail them out and put up with their chaotic disfunctional lifestyles.

There are people who end up with mental health problems, the people who squander their life chances in a haze of drug induced stupidity.

It's not called dope for nothing, people who take it are dopes, they act dopey, they are a danger to themselves an others, (so you want to be a a car with driver on canabis or have a surgeon perform an operation on you while high ?) Not everyone taking drugs ends up an addict, but who ever aims to become an addict ? Sure there are problems with the drugs laws, and we had much less of a problem with heroin when it was prescribed by doctors, but who in their right mind wants to take crack cocaine or horse tranquilisers ? Shoudl they be legalised ?
"who is the victim in this crime ? If cannabis was taxed like truly dangerous drugs that actually kill hundreds if not thousands a year (tabaco, alcohol," Well whatever the arguments about legalisation, lets not pretend canabis is harmless. Here is a man with no teeth, an addiction to canabis, and a string of health problems related to drug and alcohol abuse - inluding Hepatitis C and cirrhosis. He problably incapable of holding down a job, even if anyone would offer him one. Who are the victims ? Apart from addicts themselves there are their families, their partners, the children, their parents, their work collegues, who suffer neglect, bail them out and put up with their chaotic disfunctional lifestyles. There are people who end up with mental health problems, the people who squander their life chances in a haze of drug induced stupidity. It's not called dope for nothing, people who take it are dopes, they act dopey, they are a danger to themselves an others, (so you want to be a a car with driver on canabis or have a surgeon perform an operation on you while high ?) Not everyone taking drugs ends up an addict, but who ever aims to become an addict ? Sure there are problems with the drugs laws, and we had much less of a problem with heroin when it was prescribed by doctors, but who in their right mind wants to take crack cocaine or horse tranquilisers ? Shoudl they be legalised ? Town Guard
  • Score: 1

6:26pm Fri 1 Aug 14

popleyrebel2 says...

No political party would legalise cannabis for no other reason than it’s not a vote winner that said it would be interesting if they introduced spot drug testing at Westminster without exception.
All MPs should be tested at least twice a year, without warning.
If this is already in operation please disregard this comment.
No political party would legalise cannabis for no other reason than it’s not a vote winner that said it would be interesting if they introduced spot drug testing at Westminster without exception. All MPs should be tested at least twice a year, without warning. If this is already in operation please disregard this comment. popleyrebel2
  • Score: -6

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