Plan to put charging point for electrical vehicles in Basingstoke

Basingstoke Gazette: Plan to put charging point for electrical vehicles in Basingstoke Plan to put charging point for electrical vehicles in Basingstoke

A CHARGING point for electrical vehicles could soon be introduced in Basingstoke town centre.

Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council has applied for planning permission to install an electric vehicle rapid charger unit at Central car park, in Red Lion Lane, for electrical vehicles.

If the plan is approved, one car parking space will be lost to accommodate the charging unit which can fully charge an electrical vehicle in just 30 minutes.

A bid for Government funding from the Office for Low Emission Vehicles was successful and as a result, 75 per cent of the cost of installing the electric vehicle rapid charger will be paid for by the Government. The remaining 25 per cent will be paid for by the Nissan Consortium.

The application says: “The electric vehicle rapid charger is considered a key piece of infrastructure that will be a unique selling point for Basingstoke Town Centre, whilst encouraging the take up of electric vehicles in the local area and enabling the launch of the borough’s first 100 per cent electric private hire vehicle.”

Robert Sharpe, managing director of Evergreen Consulting, has been working closely with the borough council to introduce the first electric-powered taxi in Basingstoke.

He welcomed the news, telling The Gazette: “It is brilliant news and it means we will be able to run the first electric taxi in Hampshire from Basingstoke.

“The charger will allow people to do 160 miles a day and save £5,000 a year in fuel bills for taxi drivers.”

Comments (6)

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4:06pm Mon 23 Jun 14

laurence86 says...

Electric cars are a fun little gimmick but they are not the way forward to a greener future. The battery’s cause more problems than fossil fuels. Nissan say that you can expect their Lithium-ion battery to last 10 years. I suspect a taxi doing 160 miles and quick charging every day may wear out the battery a bit quicker. The future lays in hydrogen technology; it offers the same usability as fossil fuels and it’s only by product is H2O.
Electric cars are a fun little gimmick but they are not the way forward to a greener future. The battery’s cause more problems than fossil fuels. Nissan say that you can expect their Lithium-ion battery to last 10 years. I suspect a taxi doing 160 miles and quick charging every day may wear out the battery a bit quicker. The future lays in hydrogen technology; it offers the same usability as fossil fuels and it’s only by product is H2O. laurence86
  • Score: 0

8:55am Tue 24 Jun 14

JJ38JJ says...

Surely hydrogen cell technology is still electric? The only difference is the power source. Any development of the technology can only be beneficial to the future of electric cars - no matter how they end up being powered.
I agree with you regarding the wisdom of buying an electric car now. But the technology is still developing. Look at the mobile phones that were available 20 years ago - if no one had bought those then they would never have funded the development of the ones we see today.
I can imagine Orville and Wilbur saying to each other "what's the point in making this flying thing, no one is going to want to fly for a few yards at walking pace".
Surely hydrogen cell technology is still electric? The only difference is the power source. Any development of the technology can only be beneficial to the future of electric cars - no matter how they end up being powered. I agree with you regarding the wisdom of buying an electric car now. But the technology is still developing. Look at the mobile phones that were available 20 years ago - if no one had bought those then they would never have funded the development of the ones we see today. I can imagine Orville and Wilbur saying to each other "what's the point in making this flying thing, no one is going to want to fly for a few yards at walking pace". JJ38JJ
  • Score: 6

1:43pm Tue 24 Jun 14

laurence86 says...

JJ38JJ wrote:
Surely hydrogen cell technology is still electric? The only difference is the power source. Any development of the technology can only be beneficial to the future of electric cars - no matter how they end up being powered.
I agree with you regarding the wisdom of buying an electric car now. But the technology is still developing. Look at the mobile phones that were available 20 years ago - if no one had bought those then they would never have funded the development of the ones we see today.
I can imagine Orville and Wilbur saying to each other "what's the point in making this flying thing, no one is going to want to fly for a few yards at walking pace".
You are correct the motor technology and control systems are worthwhile developing; much of the technology used now is similar to that of your computers CD drive if on a somewhat larger scale. A hydrogen cell powered car is considered a hydrogen car because you replenish its energy store by filling its hydrogen tank in the same way as a hybrid car is considered a petrol car. An electric car is considered such because it battery has to be charged and has no other form of energy input. The big difference is that you would be able to pull into a Hydrogen filling station and fill your tank in 5 minutes without damaging your battery. Technology is best when it adapts to people rather than people having to adapt to it. The reason that electric car aren’t very popular is because of the limitations imposed by their batteries.

I suspect that we will not see a move away from fossil fuels whilst there is still so much money to be made in oil and gas.
[quote][p][bold]JJ38JJ[/bold] wrote: Surely hydrogen cell technology is still electric? The only difference is the power source. Any development of the technology can only be beneficial to the future of electric cars - no matter how they end up being powered. I agree with you regarding the wisdom of buying an electric car now. But the technology is still developing. Look at the mobile phones that were available 20 years ago - if no one had bought those then they would never have funded the development of the ones we see today. I can imagine Orville and Wilbur saying to each other "what's the point in making this flying thing, no one is going to want to fly for a few yards at walking pace".[/p][/quote]You are correct the motor technology and control systems are worthwhile developing; much of the technology used now is similar to that of your computers CD drive if on a somewhat larger scale. A hydrogen cell powered car is considered a hydrogen car because you replenish its energy store by filling its hydrogen tank in the same way as a hybrid car is considered a petrol car. An electric car is considered such because it battery has to be charged and has no other form of energy input. The big difference is that you would be able to pull into a Hydrogen filling station and fill your tank in 5 minutes without damaging your battery. Technology is best when it adapts to people rather than people having to adapt to it. The reason that electric car aren’t very popular is because of the limitations imposed by their batteries. I suspect that we will not see a move away from fossil fuels whilst there is still so much money to be made in oil and gas. laurence86
  • Score: 2

2:14pm Tue 24 Jun 14

Buster Preciation says...

The way I see it the main drawback is the time taken to charge the batteries which will never be as fast as simply topping up your tank regardless of what you are topping it up with.
If I was developing the electric car I'd concentrate on making the batteries more portable, robust and with a longer life so you could just pull in to a petrol station (?) and swap a discharged battery for a charged one. The station could charge them up off-line so to speak. Maybe even during the night whilst the electric is cheaper. Or the driver could simply buy two battery packs with the vehicle and swap them over daily.
The way I see it the main drawback is the time taken to charge the batteries which will never be as fast as simply topping up your tank regardless of what you are topping it up with. If I was developing the electric car I'd concentrate on making the batteries more portable, robust and with a longer life so you could just pull in to a petrol station (?) and swap a discharged battery for a charged one. The station could charge them up off-line so to speak. Maybe even during the night whilst the electric is cheaper. Or the driver could simply buy two battery packs with the vehicle and swap them over daily. Buster Preciation
  • Score: 7

5:48pm Tue 24 Jun 14

jmwturner says...

Electric cars merely move the pollution from the exhaust pipe of the car to the power station.
Until we generate electricity in an environmentally responsible way, people are just being fooled.
We need to be using tidal and wave energy as our primary power source, and not fooling around with intermittent wind power sources.
Electric cars merely move the pollution from the exhaust pipe of the car to the power station. Until we generate electricity in an environmentally responsible way, people are just being fooled. We need to be using tidal and wave energy as our primary power source, and not fooling around with intermittent wind power sources. jmwturner
  • Score: 6

1:24pm Wed 25 Jun 14

Buster Preciation says...

jmwturner wrote:
Electric cars merely move the pollution from the exhaust pipe of the car to the power station.
Until we generate electricity in an environmentally responsible way, people are just being fooled.
We need to be using tidal and wave energy as our primary power source, and not fooling around with intermittent wind power sources.
That's not really relevant though is it? Where we get the power from and what we use it for are two different topics. Are you arguing that electric cars should not be developed because where we currently get the electric from is not sustainable? Surely it is better to develop electric cars AND generate sustainable power. They are not mutually exclusive.

Besides electric cars are already more energy efficient than fossil-fuelled cars as the electric motor is more efficient than the internal combustion engine which is running even when the car is stationary. The main environmental drawback of current electric cars, as the first poster said, is the impact of battery life cycle.
[quote][p][bold]jmwturner[/bold] wrote: Electric cars merely move the pollution from the exhaust pipe of the car to the power station. Until we generate electricity in an environmentally responsible way, people are just being fooled. We need to be using tidal and wave energy as our primary power source, and not fooling around with intermittent wind power sources.[/p][/quote]That's not really relevant though is it? Where we get the power from and what we use it for are two different topics. Are you arguing that electric cars should not be developed because where we currently get the electric from is not sustainable? Surely it is better to develop electric cars AND generate sustainable power. They are not mutually exclusive. Besides electric cars are already more energy efficient than fossil-fuelled cars as the electric motor is more efficient than the internal combustion engine which is running even when the car is stationary. The main environmental drawback of current electric cars, as the first poster said, is the impact of battery life cycle. Buster Preciation
  • Score: 2

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