Hook parents threatened with fines for unauthorised school absences

Hook parents threatened with fines for unauthorised school absences

Hook parents threatened with fines for unauthorised school absences

First published in News

PARENTS who take their children out of a Hook school without permission could be issued with penalty fines.

The governors at Hook Junior School, in Church View, have agreed that staff can fine parents £60 for unauthorised absences.

The change, outlined by parent governor Janet Stebbing in the Hook Focus magazine, comes after the governors noticed an increase in requests to take children out of school during term-time.

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9:28am Tue 10 Jun 14

laurence86 says...

hmm.... £60 fine per child or £200* per person off your holiday

* £200pp being a conservative statement I have seen jumps of £800pp for some holidays.
hmm.... £60 fine per child or £200* per person off your holiday * £200pp being a conservative statement I have seen jumps of £800pp for some holidays. laurence86
  • Score: 10

11:27am Tue 10 Jun 14

JJ38JJ says...

Do we get £60 back when the schools are closed because of strikes or the threat of snow?
Do we get £60 back when the schools are closed because of strikes or the threat of snow? JJ38JJ
  • Score: 5

12:42pm Tue 10 Jun 14

jonone says...

Funny how schools can threaten fines etc. for this, yet have no issue with holding INSET days on the first days of term after a holiday! Odd how the loss of those days don't impact a child's education!!
Funny how schools can threaten fines etc. for this, yet have no issue with holding INSET days on the first days of term after a holiday! Odd how the loss of those days don't impact a child's education!! jonone
  • Score: 7

1:08pm Tue 10 Jun 14

toffeeblock says...

For those who scrimp and save and still can't afford a UK based holiday in approved periods, fair enough - take the kids out the last week of the summer term (for example) to minimise the impact. But most parents I hear complaining about holiday costs seem to be those who have more than one holiday a year anyway, abroad mostly sitting on the beach sipping cocktails after dumping their kids in the kids-club. God forbid they play by the rules and have a less luxurious (but more rewarding for the kids) holiday here in the UK somewhere.
For those who scrimp and save and still can't afford a UK based holiday in approved periods, fair enough - take the kids out the last week of the summer term (for example) to minimise the impact. But most parents I hear complaining about holiday costs seem to be those who have more than one holiday a year anyway, abroad mostly sitting on the beach sipping cocktails after dumping their kids in the kids-club. God forbid they play by the rules and have a less luxurious (but more rewarding for the kids) holiday here in the UK somewhere. toffeeblock
  • Score: 4

1:18pm Tue 10 Jun 14

robertspet8 says...

I have tried to find out what the impact to a child's education would be if they were taken out of school for a 10 day family holiday each year. I cannot find any recent evidence of what, if any, harm this would do. All I can find are general statements that it is not desirable and against the law. However I have found the results of a survey of current top earners (2,200 people earning more than £60,000pa) which reveals that 67% of them were taken out of school for family holidays and 90% of these thought it had done no harm to their education or chances in life.
There is research that shows that chilldren who regularly bunk-off are far more likely to fail at school and become involved in crime. But I cannot find anything to show that children, taken out of school by responsible parents for a family holiday, are suffering any significant or lasting damage to their future prospects in school or later life.
I have tried to find out what the impact to a child's education would be if they were taken out of school for a 10 day family holiday each year. I cannot find any recent evidence of what, if any, harm this would do. All I can find are general statements that it is not desirable and against the law. However I have found the results of a survey of current top earners (2,200 people earning more than £60,000pa) which reveals that 67% of them were taken out of school for family holidays and 90% of these thought it had done no harm to their education or chances in life. There is research that shows that chilldren who regularly bunk-off are far more likely to fail at school and become involved in crime. But I cannot find anything to show that children, taken out of school by responsible parents for a family holiday, are suffering any significant or lasting damage to their future prospects in school or later life. robertspet8
  • Score: 12

4:00pm Tue 10 Jun 14

Peter H. says...

Are prices inflated for school holidays or discounted during term time? We accept the notion of peak and off peak fares for trains, so it’s a matter of perspective.

Even so, parent’s frustration is understandable.

Perhaps the solution is not taking kids out of school but in changing the system itself. In Germany, each State sets its own term times; summer holidays start early June in some areas and run to late September in others, thus spreading demand across 4 months rather than 6 weeks.

Since our current system is based on the historic needs of farming perhaps it could be revised.

Mind you, when it was proposed we permanently advance clocks by one hour, Daily Mail seized on this as ‘forcing German Time upon us’. Given the current xenophobia going around, I guess both it and the Ukippers are likely to have kittens :)
Are prices inflated for school holidays or discounted during term time? We accept the notion of peak and off peak fares for trains, so it’s a matter of perspective. Even so, parent’s frustration is understandable. Perhaps the solution is not taking kids out of school but in changing the system itself. In Germany, each State sets its own term times; summer holidays start early June in some areas and run to late September in others, thus spreading demand across 4 months rather than 6 weeks. Since our current system is based on the historic needs of farming perhaps it could be revised. Mind you, when it was proposed we permanently advance clocks by one hour, Daily Mail seized on this as ‘forcing German Time upon us’. Given the current xenophobia going around, I guess both it and the Ukippers are likely to have kittens :) Peter H.
  • Score: 7

4:59pm Tue 10 Jun 14

laurence86 says...

Peter H. wrote:
Are prices inflated for school holidays or discounted during term time? We accept the notion of peak and off peak fares for trains, so it’s a matter of perspective.

Even so, parent’s frustration is understandable.

Perhaps the solution is not taking kids out of school but in changing the system itself. In Germany, each State sets its own term times; summer holidays start early June in some areas and run to late September in others, thus spreading demand across 4 months rather than 6 weeks.

Since our current system is based on the historic needs of farming perhaps it could be revised.

Mind you, when it was proposed we permanently advance clocks by one hour, Daily Mail seized on this as ‘forcing German Time upon us’. Given the current xenophobia going around, I guess both it and the Ukippers are likely to have kittens :)
It is a bit of both. In the summer the demand is high and there are limited spaces so the price goes up to match. Out of the season the demand drops off and prices’ have to drop low to attract buyers. Prices’ may seem high but when I was selling holidays there were times when we simply had nothing available. As a tip if you are looking at a short haul holiday book your flights as far in advance as you can. All the holiday airlines now work on the same principles as low cost airlines were the seats increase in cost as they sell out. Gone are the days of last minute deals sadly.

It seems rather odd that the Daily Mail would consider us ridding daylight saving hours as the Germans forcing German time upon us. The idea of daylight saving time was first put into practice by the German government during the First World War. In an effort to conserve fuel Germany and Austria began saving daylight at 11 p.m. on the 30th of April, 1916, by advancing the clock one hour until October 1, 1916. Britain began 3 weeks later, on 21 May 1916. This was immediately followed by other countries in Europe, Belgium, Denmark, France, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Sweden, and Turkey. Considering our modern offices have to be lit during the day removing daylight saving is unlikely to affect many people’s lives or fuel bill.
[quote][p][bold]Peter H.[/bold] wrote: Are prices inflated for school holidays or discounted during term time? We accept the notion of peak and off peak fares for trains, so it’s a matter of perspective. Even so, parent’s frustration is understandable. Perhaps the solution is not taking kids out of school but in changing the system itself. In Germany, each State sets its own term times; summer holidays start early June in some areas and run to late September in others, thus spreading demand across 4 months rather than 6 weeks. Since our current system is based on the historic needs of farming perhaps it could be revised. Mind you, when it was proposed we permanently advance clocks by one hour, Daily Mail seized on this as ‘forcing German Time upon us’. Given the current xenophobia going around, I guess both it and the Ukippers are likely to have kittens :)[/p][/quote]It is a bit of both. In the summer the demand is high and there are limited spaces so the price goes up to match. Out of the season the demand drops off and prices’ have to drop low to attract buyers. Prices’ may seem high but when I was selling holidays there were times when we simply had nothing available. As a tip if you are looking at a short haul holiday book your flights as far in advance as you can. All the holiday airlines now work on the same principles as low cost airlines were the seats increase in cost as they sell out. Gone are the days of last minute deals sadly. It seems rather odd that the Daily Mail would consider us ridding daylight saving hours as the Germans forcing German time upon us. The idea of daylight saving time was first put into practice by the German government during the First World War. In an effort to conserve fuel Germany and Austria began saving daylight at 11 p.m. on the 30th of April, 1916, by advancing the clock one hour until October 1, 1916. Britain began 3 weeks later, on 21 May 1916. This was immediately followed by other countries in Europe, Belgium, Denmark, France, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Sweden, and Turkey. Considering our modern offices have to be lit during the day removing daylight saving is unlikely to affect many people’s lives or fuel bill. laurence86
  • Score: 4

6:20pm Tue 10 Jun 14

Peter H. says...

Excellent points Laurence!

Correct me if I’m wrong, but I understand airlines (and holiday companies too probably) have sophisticated pricing systems that are both predictive and highly responsive. On some flights margins can be vanishingly small, so it makes sense to get the best return. Similarly, it makes no sense to fly planes for only 6 weeks a year, so spreading demand could be a win/win solution – I wonder what the industry thinks about that?

I guess Central European Time, as it’s properly known, isn’t nearly as pejorative as ‘German Time’ which is why Daily Mail chose to use it. I recall they helpfully included a photo of the Kaiser along with it.

Another DM favourite is ‘Frankenfoods’ for GM crops :)
Excellent points Laurence! Correct me if I’m wrong, but I understand airlines (and holiday companies too probably) have sophisticated pricing systems that are both predictive and highly responsive. On some flights margins can be vanishingly small, so it makes sense to get the best return. Similarly, it makes no sense to fly planes for only 6 weeks a year, so spreading demand could be a win/win solution – I wonder what the industry thinks about that? I guess Central European Time, as it’s properly known, isn’t nearly as pejorative as ‘German Time’ which is why Daily Mail chose to use it. I recall they helpfully included a photo of the Kaiser along with it. Another DM favourite is ‘Frankenfoods’ for GM crops :) Peter H.
  • Score: 4

8:24am Wed 11 Jun 14

parentswantasay says...

What dreadful reporting! Staff can ot fine parents only the LEA (local educating authority) and they are fining not because of an increase in requests, they are fining because of the new regulation that came in sept 13!
parents want a say is fighting this new regulation and seeking judical reviews to take schools to court over some heinous decisions. we have a FB page and website parents want a say co .uk
What dreadful reporting! Staff can ot fine parents only the LEA (local educating authority) and they are fining not because of an increase in requests, they are fining because of the new regulation that came in sept 13! parents want a say is fighting this new regulation and seeking judical reviews to take schools to court over some heinous decisions. we have a FB page and website parents want a say co .uk parentswantasay
  • Score: -2

10:10am Wed 11 Jun 14

JJ38JJ says...

toffeeblock wrote:
For those who scrimp and save and still can't afford a UK based holiday in approved periods, fair enough - take the kids out the last week of the summer term (for example) to minimise the impact. But most parents I hear complaining about holiday costs seem to be those who have more than one holiday a year anyway, abroad mostly sitting on the beach sipping cocktails after dumping their kids in the kids-club. God forbid they play by the rules and have a less luxurious (but more rewarding for the kids) holiday here in the UK somewhere.
A tad judgemental there. All parents I know of complain about the costs of holidays not just the ones that have more than one a year. As for your observation that "most" parents rid themselves of parental duty whilst on holiday you may be right in some cases. But if you think it is the norm then it says more about the company you keep rather than society as a whole.
[quote][p][bold]toffeeblock[/bold] wrote: For those who scrimp and save and still can't afford a UK based holiday in approved periods, fair enough - take the kids out the last week of the summer term (for example) to minimise the impact. But most parents I hear complaining about holiday costs seem to be those who have more than one holiday a year anyway, abroad mostly sitting on the beach sipping cocktails after dumping their kids in the kids-club. God forbid they play by the rules and have a less luxurious (but more rewarding for the kids) holiday here in the UK somewhere.[/p][/quote]A tad judgemental there. All parents I know of complain about the costs of holidays not just the ones that have more than one a year. As for your observation that "most" parents rid themselves of parental duty whilst on holiday you may be right in some cases. But if you think it is the norm then it says more about the company you keep rather than society as a whole. JJ38JJ
  • Score: 6

10:56am Wed 11 Jun 14

toffeeblock says...

JJ38JJ wrote:
toffeeblock wrote: For those who scrimp and save and still can't afford a UK based holiday in approved periods, fair enough - take the kids out the last week of the summer term (for example) to minimise the impact. But most parents I hear complaining about holiday costs seem to be those who have more than one holiday a year anyway, abroad mostly sitting on the beach sipping cocktails after dumping their kids in the kids-club. God forbid they play by the rules and have a less luxurious (but more rewarding for the kids) holiday here in the UK somewhere.
A tad judgemental there. All parents I know of complain about the costs of holidays not just the ones that have more than one a year. As for your observation that "most" parents rid themselves of parental duty whilst on holiday you may be right in some cases. But if you think it is the norm then it says more about the company you keep rather than society as a whole.
I hear and read the complaints, they don't come on my camping holidays that's for sure. Maybe I am judgemental but I'm sick of hearing all this winging about the cost of holidays like it's a god given right to have 2 weeks abroad in the sun every year.

Perhaps those who complain most missed some days of their own education when the rest of us we learning about supply and demand in a free market economy!
[quote][p][bold]JJ38JJ[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]toffeeblock[/bold] wrote: For those who scrimp and save and still can't afford a UK based holiday in approved periods, fair enough - take the kids out the last week of the summer term (for example) to minimise the impact. But most parents I hear complaining about holiday costs seem to be those who have more than one holiday a year anyway, abroad mostly sitting on the beach sipping cocktails after dumping their kids in the kids-club. God forbid they play by the rules and have a less luxurious (but more rewarding for the kids) holiday here in the UK somewhere.[/p][/quote]A tad judgemental there. All parents I know of complain about the costs of holidays not just the ones that have more than one a year. As for your observation that "most" parents rid themselves of parental duty whilst on holiday you may be right in some cases. But if you think it is the norm then it says more about the company you keep rather than society as a whole.[/p][/quote]I hear and read the complaints, they don't come on my camping holidays that's for sure. Maybe I am judgemental but I'm sick of hearing all this winging about the cost of holidays like it's a god given right to have 2 weeks abroad in the sun every year. Perhaps those who complain most missed some days of their own education when the rest of us we learning about supply and demand in a free market economy! toffeeblock
  • Score: -1

11:21am Wed 11 Jun 14

JJ38JJ says...

toffeeblock wrote:
JJ38JJ wrote:
toffeeblock wrote: For those who scrimp and save and still can't afford a UK based holiday in approved periods, fair enough - take the kids out the last week of the summer term (for example) to minimise the impact. But most parents I hear complaining about holiday costs seem to be those who have more than one holiday a year anyway, abroad mostly sitting on the beach sipping cocktails after dumping their kids in the kids-club. God forbid they play by the rules and have a less luxurious (but more rewarding for the kids) holiday here in the UK somewhere.
A tad judgemental there. All parents I know of complain about the costs of holidays not just the ones that have more than one a year. As for your observation that "most" parents rid themselves of parental duty whilst on holiday you may be right in some cases. But if you think it is the norm then it says more about the company you keep rather than society as a whole.
I hear and read the complaints, they don't come on my camping holidays that's for sure. Maybe I am judgemental but I'm sick of hearing all this winging about the cost of holidays like it's a god given right to have 2 weeks abroad in the sun every year.

Perhaps those who complain most missed some days of their own education when the rest of us we learning about supply and demand in a free market economy!
Who said anything about going abroad or enjoying the sun? The hike in the costs of holidays are not just confined to foreign holidays in the summer. Try booking a holiday cottage, campsite, hotel, etc. in the UK during any of the school holidays.
Of course holidays are not a "God-given right" but every person deserves the same opportunity as the next person. And before you say that it's a parents choice to have kids (which I agree with) the costs effect non-parents who want to take a holiday. They are being penalised for other people's decision to start families.
[quote][p][bold]toffeeblock[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]JJ38JJ[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]toffeeblock[/bold] wrote: For those who scrimp and save and still can't afford a UK based holiday in approved periods, fair enough - take the kids out the last week of the summer term (for example) to minimise the impact. But most parents I hear complaining about holiday costs seem to be those who have more than one holiday a year anyway, abroad mostly sitting on the beach sipping cocktails after dumping their kids in the kids-club. God forbid they play by the rules and have a less luxurious (but more rewarding for the kids) holiday here in the UK somewhere.[/p][/quote]A tad judgemental there. All parents I know of complain about the costs of holidays not just the ones that have more than one a year. As for your observation that "most" parents rid themselves of parental duty whilst on holiday you may be right in some cases. But if you think it is the norm then it says more about the company you keep rather than society as a whole.[/p][/quote]I hear and read the complaints, they don't come on my camping holidays that's for sure. Maybe I am judgemental but I'm sick of hearing all this winging about the cost of holidays like it's a god given right to have 2 weeks abroad in the sun every year. Perhaps those who complain most missed some days of their own education when the rest of us we learning about supply and demand in a free market economy![/p][/quote]Who said anything about going abroad or enjoying the sun? The hike in the costs of holidays are not just confined to foreign holidays in the summer. Try booking a holiday cottage, campsite, hotel, etc. in the UK during any of the school holidays. Of course holidays are not a "God-given right" but every person deserves the same opportunity as the next person. And before you say that it's a parents choice to have kids (which I agree with) the costs effect non-parents who want to take a holiday. They are being penalised for other people's decision to start families. JJ38JJ
  • Score: 1

12:18pm Wed 11 Jun 14

jonone says...

toffeeblock wrote:
JJ38JJ wrote:
toffeeblock wrote: For those who scrimp and save and still can't afford a UK based holiday in approved periods, fair enough - take the kids out the last week of the summer term (for example) to minimise the impact. But most parents I hear complaining about holiday costs seem to be those who have more than one holiday a year anyway, abroad mostly sitting on the beach sipping cocktails after dumping their kids in the kids-club. God forbid they play by the rules and have a less luxurious (but more rewarding for the kids) holiday here in the UK somewhere.
A tad judgemental there. All parents I know of complain about the costs of holidays not just the ones that have more than one a year. As for your observation that "most" parents rid themselves of parental duty whilst on holiday you may be right in some cases. But if you think it is the norm then it says more about the company you keep rather than society as a whole.
I hear and read the complaints, they don't come on my camping holidays that's for sure. Maybe I am judgemental but I'm sick of hearing all this winging about the cost of holidays like it's a god given right to have 2 weeks abroad in the sun every year. Perhaps those who complain most missed some days of their own education when the rest of us we learning about supply and demand in a free market economy!
Who said anything about 2 weeks in the sun? As pointed out elsewhere all UK based holiday prices also rocket in peak holiday times, even on single bedroom cottages & hotel rooms for two. Unless my decision to have a family is what makes the weather better in summer?

However, it makes me smile when all the complaints are about poverty and high prices yet suddenly demand for holidays and passports is shown to be so high!!
[quote][p][bold]toffeeblock[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]JJ38JJ[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]toffeeblock[/bold] wrote: For those who scrimp and save and still can't afford a UK based holiday in approved periods, fair enough - take the kids out the last week of the summer term (for example) to minimise the impact. But most parents I hear complaining about holiday costs seem to be those who have more than one holiday a year anyway, abroad mostly sitting on the beach sipping cocktails after dumping their kids in the kids-club. God forbid they play by the rules and have a less luxurious (but more rewarding for the kids) holiday here in the UK somewhere.[/p][/quote]A tad judgemental there. All parents I know of complain about the costs of holidays not just the ones that have more than one a year. As for your observation that "most" parents rid themselves of parental duty whilst on holiday you may be right in some cases. But if you think it is the norm then it says more about the company you keep rather than society as a whole.[/p][/quote]I hear and read the complaints, they don't come on my camping holidays that's for sure. Maybe I am judgemental but I'm sick of hearing all this winging about the cost of holidays like it's a god given right to have 2 weeks abroad in the sun every year. Perhaps those who complain most missed some days of their own education when the rest of us we learning about supply and demand in a free market economy![/p][/quote]Who said anything about 2 weeks in the sun? As pointed out elsewhere all UK based holiday prices also rocket in peak holiday times, even on single bedroom cottages & hotel rooms for two. Unless my decision to have a family is what makes the weather better in summer? However, it makes me smile when all the complaints are about poverty and high prices yet suddenly demand for holidays and passports is shown to be so high!! jonone
  • Score: 4

9:52am Thu 12 Jun 14

Folkestone Saint says...

jonone wrote:
toffeeblock wrote:
JJ38JJ wrote:
toffeeblock wrote: For those who scrimp and save and still can't afford a UK based holiday in approved periods, fair enough - take the kids out the last week of the summer term (for example) to minimise the impact. But most parents I hear complaining about holiday costs seem to be those who have more than one holiday a year anyway, abroad mostly sitting on the beach sipping cocktails after dumping their kids in the kids-club. God forbid they play by the rules and have a less luxurious (but more rewarding for the kids) holiday here in the UK somewhere.
A tad judgemental there. All parents I know of complain about the costs of holidays not just the ones that have more than one a year. As for your observation that "most" parents rid themselves of parental duty whilst on holiday you may be right in some cases. But if you think it is the norm then it says more about the company you keep rather than society as a whole.
I hear and read the complaints, they don't come on my camping holidays that's for sure. Maybe I am judgemental but I'm sick of hearing all this winging about the cost of holidays like it's a god given right to have 2 weeks abroad in the sun every year. Perhaps those who complain most missed some days of their own education when the rest of us we learning about supply and demand in a free market economy!
Who said anything about 2 weeks in the sun? As pointed out elsewhere all UK based holiday prices also rocket in peak holiday times, even on single bedroom cottages & hotel rooms for two. Unless my decision to have a family is what makes the weather better in summer?

However, it makes me smile when all the complaints are about poverty and high prices yet suddenly demand for holidays and passports is shown to be so high!!
It's not suddenly, apart from those in a coma for the last 20 years the rest of us have seen this story or been a victim of the prices for years, all I can say to parents of young children now is that as mine are 18 and 23, I really enjoyed Tunisia for a third of the price a few weeks ago and look forward to going away in September and so will you one day, but I wish mine where still young'ens.
[quote][p][bold]jonone[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]toffeeblock[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]JJ38JJ[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]toffeeblock[/bold] wrote: For those who scrimp and save and still can't afford a UK based holiday in approved periods, fair enough - take the kids out the last week of the summer term (for example) to minimise the impact. But most parents I hear complaining about holiday costs seem to be those who have more than one holiday a year anyway, abroad mostly sitting on the beach sipping cocktails after dumping their kids in the kids-club. God forbid they play by the rules and have a less luxurious (but more rewarding for the kids) holiday here in the UK somewhere.[/p][/quote]A tad judgemental there. All parents I know of complain about the costs of holidays not just the ones that have more than one a year. As for your observation that "most" parents rid themselves of parental duty whilst on holiday you may be right in some cases. But if you think it is the norm then it says more about the company you keep rather than society as a whole.[/p][/quote]I hear and read the complaints, they don't come on my camping holidays that's for sure. Maybe I am judgemental but I'm sick of hearing all this winging about the cost of holidays like it's a god given right to have 2 weeks abroad in the sun every year. Perhaps those who complain most missed some days of their own education when the rest of us we learning about supply and demand in a free market economy![/p][/quote]Who said anything about 2 weeks in the sun? As pointed out elsewhere all UK based holiday prices also rocket in peak holiday times, even on single bedroom cottages & hotel rooms for two. Unless my decision to have a family is what makes the weather better in summer? However, it makes me smile when all the complaints are about poverty and high prices yet suddenly demand for holidays and passports is shown to be so high!![/p][/quote]It's not suddenly, apart from those in a coma for the last 20 years the rest of us have seen this story or been a victim of the prices for years, all I can say to parents of young children now is that as mine are 18 and 23, I really enjoyed Tunisia for a third of the price a few weeks ago and look forward to going away in September and so will you one day, but I wish mine where still young'ens. Folkestone Saint
  • Score: 3

3:22pm Fri 13 Jun 14

4rchibald says...

toffeeblock wrote:
For those who scrimp and save and still can't afford a UK based holiday in approved periods, fair enough - take the kids out the last week of the summer term (for example) to minimise the impact. But most parents I hear complaining about holiday costs seem to be those who have more than one holiday a year anyway, abroad mostly sitting on the beach sipping cocktails after dumping their kids in the kids-club. God forbid they play by the rules and have a less luxurious (but more rewarding for the kids) holiday here in the UK somewhere.
1) I could not find cheaper UK holidays than what we found in France, unless you are talking about day trips to overcrowded south coast.
2) Maybe it's not just about cost, but also avoidance of crowds during peaks?
3) why UK holidays are "more rewarding for the kids"?
[quote][p][bold]toffeeblock[/bold] wrote: For those who scrimp and save and still can't afford a UK based holiday in approved periods, fair enough - take the kids out the last week of the summer term (for example) to minimise the impact. But most parents I hear complaining about holiday costs seem to be those who have more than one holiday a year anyway, abroad mostly sitting on the beach sipping cocktails after dumping their kids in the kids-club. God forbid they play by the rules and have a less luxurious (but more rewarding for the kids) holiday here in the UK somewhere.[/p][/quote]1) I could not find cheaper UK holidays than what we found in France, unless you are talking about day trips to overcrowded south coast. 2) Maybe it's not just about cost, but also avoidance of crowds during peaks? 3) why UK holidays are "more rewarding for the kids"? 4rchibald
  • Score: -2

4:14pm Fri 13 Jun 14

Folkestone Saint says...

Find a free school that has flexabillity, or open up a free school and set your own time table,
Find a free school that has flexabillity, or open up a free school and set your own time table, Folkestone Saint
  • Score: -3

4:41pm Fri 13 Jun 14

Sam_Walker123456 says...

parentswantasay wrote:
What dreadful reporting! Staff can ot fine parents only the LEA (local educating authority) and they are fining not because of an increase in requests, they are fining because of the new regulation that came in sept 13!
parents want a say is fighting this new regulation and seeking judical reviews to take schools to court over some heinous decisions. we have a FB page and website parents want a say co .uk
I am not a parent, but if I was I would not want parentswantasay to represent me.
You criticise The Gazette but your comment is full of factual errors and grammatical howlers. I will ignore the bad grammar and just deal with your factual mistakes.
First you claim only the LEA can issue a fine. This is wrong as can be seen from the below extract from the relevant government regulations:
'Who is authorised to issue penalty notices?
A police constable, local authority officer, headteachers and those authorised by them (deputy and assistant head only).'
This makes it clear that not only the LEA but also a PC or school head can issue the penalty notice (fine).
You then say that the fines are not being issued in response to an increase in requests but because of the new regulation. Again you are wrong. There is not a new regulation but only changes to existing regulations. These changes were introduced in response to a report, commissioned by the government, which showed there was increasing absence from school for family holidays. The goverment was concerned that many parents seemed to have the idea that they were entitled to take their children out of school for family holidays for 10 days each year. No such entitlement existed and the change to the legislation helped make this clear. Hook Junior School are entitled to use this power to issue fines to try to put a brake on the increase in unauthorised holiday leave. The power to fine already existed in the old regulations so your claim that the school is fining because of new regulations is wrong. The regulation says that absence for any purpose can only be authorised under exceptional circumstances - different head teachers will have different views on what can be considered as exceptional circumstances.
Finally, my own view is that a family holiday taken in school time, but not during a critical period in a childs education, will not do any lasting damage to that child's education. I was taken out of school for family holidays on many occasions and I don't think it has done me any harm - at least I can look-up and read the relevant legislation and can write a comment without too many errors.
Now that has really set me up to be shot down!
[quote][p][bold]parentswantasay[/bold] wrote: What dreadful reporting! Staff can ot fine parents only the LEA (local educating authority) and they are fining not because of an increase in requests, they are fining because of the new regulation that came in sept 13! parents want a say is fighting this new regulation and seeking judical reviews to take schools to court over some heinous decisions. we have a FB page and website parents want a say co .uk[/p][/quote]I am not a parent, but if I was I would not want parentswantasay to represent me. You criticise The Gazette but your comment is full of factual errors and grammatical howlers. I will ignore the bad grammar and just deal with your factual mistakes. First you claim only the LEA can issue a fine. This is wrong as can be seen from the below extract from the relevant government regulations: 'Who is authorised to issue penalty notices? A police constable, local authority officer, headteachers and those authorised by them (deputy and assistant head only).' This makes it clear that not only the LEA but also a PC or school head can issue the penalty notice (fine). You then say that the fines are not being issued in response to an increase in requests but because of the new regulation. Again you are wrong. There is not a new regulation but only changes to existing regulations. These changes were introduced in response to a report, commissioned by the government, which showed there was increasing absence from school for family holidays. The goverment was concerned that many parents seemed to have the idea that they were entitled to take their children out of school for family holidays for 10 days each year. No such entitlement existed and the change to the legislation helped make this clear. Hook Junior School are entitled to use this power to issue fines to try to put a brake on the increase in unauthorised holiday leave. The power to fine already existed in the old regulations so your claim that the school is fining because of new regulations is wrong. The regulation says that absence for any purpose can only be authorised under exceptional circumstances - different head teachers will have different views on what can be considered as exceptional circumstances. Finally, my own view is that a family holiday taken in school time, but not during a critical period in a childs education, will not do any lasting damage to that child's education. I was taken out of school for family holidays on many occasions and I don't think it has done me any harm - at least I can look-up and read the relevant legislation and can write a comment without too many errors. Now that has really set me up to be shot down! Sam_Walker123456
  • Score: 8

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