Nine most expensive properties for sale in the Basingstoke area

Basingstoke Gazette: List of top most expensive properties for sale in the area List of top most expensive properties for sale in the area

GIVEN the chance, we’d all love to snoop around the home of a multi-millionaire. Well, now you can!

The Gazette has scoured the housing market to bring to you some of the most expensive properties for sale in the area, with pictures showing inside and out. From swimming pools to spiral staircases, there’s something to suit everyone’s taste!

First on the list is a six-bedroom house in Bramshill, Hook. With seven reception rooms, five bathrooms, a swimming pool, tennis court, lakes (yes that’s plural), ponds and a river, it is available through Knight Frank with a guide price of £7.95million.

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Second is an eight-bedroom detached house near Dummer, with a guide price of a whopping £6m. Being sold by Savills, the property sits within 313 acres of land.

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At £3.8m, third on the list is a six-bedroom ‘equestrian facility’ for sale in Ecchinswell. The house boasts a drawing room, breakfast room, larder, utility and boot room. On the market with Strutt and Parker, the property also includes a bathroom swimming pool, stable block and paddock.

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A seven bedroom detached house in Sherfield-on-Loddon is fourth on the list, priced at £2.8m. Described as a “fine family house” which was built in 2004, it includes landscaped gardens, three garages and games room, plus 4.82 acres of land. Being sold by Knight Frank, the property also comes with under-floor heating – what a luxury!

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Basingstoke Gazette:

This Grade II Georgian village house is for sale for £2.65m with Knight Frank. Situated in the popular village of Odiham, next door to the church, the three-floor house comprises five reception rooms, seven bedrooms, six bathrooms and a walled garden.

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In at number six is a six-bedroom detached house in the village of Oakley. For sale with Knight Frank for £2.65m, the late Regency farmhouse is accompanied by 22.46 acres.

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Number seven is a five-bedroom detached house in Burghclere, priced at £2.4m. The 1930s country house has its own lake, and views of the North Hampshire Downs. For sale with Winkworth, the grand reception hall has a sweeping main staircase to the first floor.

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For £2.15m, this six-bedroom detached house in Herriard could all be yours. Being sold by Knight Frank, the property was originally built as a vicarage and dates from 1870. A unique selling point is that cricket can be played along the indoor passages and teenage parties held in the cellar. We’re sold!

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Last but not least is a £2m eight-bedroom house in Sherfield-on-Loddon, for sale with Gasgoine Pees. The manor house is situated in 19 acres with equestrian facilities and swimming pool. The kitchen has a central island and breakfast bar.

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Comments (11)

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5:05pm Wed 4 Jun 14

jonone says...

"The Gazette has scoured the housing market to bring to you some of the most expensive properties for sale in the area"

Translation - we were bored and needed to fill some space.
"The Gazette has scoured the housing market to bring to you some of the most expensive properties for sale in the area" Translation - we were bored and needed to fill some space. jonone
  • Score: -4

8:02am Thu 5 Jun 14

JJ38JJ says...

jonone wrote:
"The Gazette has scoured the housing market to bring to you some of the most expensive properties for sale in the area"

Translation - we were bored and needed to fill some space.
Sounds like doesn't it. There must be something happening in Overton, surely.
But this format is potentially endless:
Top ten earners in Basingstoke.
People with the biggest ten swimming pools in Basingstoke.
Ten flashiest cars registered in Basingstoke.
Biggest Adam's apple in Basingstoke.

How about something a bit more useful like:
Top ten cheapest properties on sale in Basingstoke.
[quote][p][bold]jonone[/bold] wrote: "The Gazette has scoured the housing market to bring to you some of the most expensive properties for sale in the area" Translation - we were bored and needed to fill some space.[/p][/quote]Sounds like doesn't it. There must be something happening in Overton, surely. But this format is potentially endless: Top ten earners in Basingstoke. People with the biggest ten swimming pools in Basingstoke. Ten flashiest cars registered in Basingstoke. Biggest Adam's apple in Basingstoke. How about something a bit more useful like: Top ten cheapest properties on sale in Basingstoke. JJ38JJ
  • Score: -3

4:37pm Thu 5 Jun 14

Max Headroom says...

And with the most basic, run-down two-bedroom homes in Basingstoke starting at £175k, what chance does the average young person in Basingstoke have of owning any sort of home, never mind the mansions shown here?
And with the most basic, run-down two-bedroom homes in Basingstoke starting at £175k, what chance does the average young person in Basingstoke have of owning any sort of home, never mind the mansions shown here? Max Headroom
  • Score: 9

9:28am Fri 6 Jun 14

jonone says...

Max Headroom wrote:
And with the most basic, run-down two-bedroom homes in Basingstoke starting at £175k, what chance does the average young person in Basingstoke have of owning any sort of home, never mind the mansions shown here?
Two options.

1) Hard Work (for which it is politically incorrect to suggest the owners and prospective owners of these properties have done)

2) Shack up as a couple, bang out kids, get a part time, low income job and let the mugs at 1) pay for you to have a nice social house and live a nice cushty life with Labour voters making out how hard up and vunerable you are.
[quote][p][bold]Max Headroom[/bold] wrote: And with the most basic, run-down two-bedroom homes in Basingstoke starting at £175k, what chance does the average young person in Basingstoke have of owning any sort of home, never mind the mansions shown here?[/p][/quote]Two options. 1) Hard Work (for which it is politically incorrect to suggest the owners and prospective owners of these properties have done) 2) Shack up as a couple, bang out kids, get a part time, low income job and let the mugs at 1) pay for you to have a nice social house and live a nice cushty life with Labour voters making out how hard up and vunerable you are. jonone
  • Score: -1

10:21am Fri 6 Jun 14

JJ38JJ says...

Max Headroom wrote:
And with the most basic, run-down two-bedroom homes in Basingstoke starting at £175k, what chance does the average young person in Basingstoke have of owning any sort of home, never mind the mansions shown here?
If that was correct then there would be loads of empty houses. Obviously people can afford them because they are being bought.
[quote][p][bold]Max Headroom[/bold] wrote: And with the most basic, run-down two-bedroom homes in Basingstoke starting at £175k, what chance does the average young person in Basingstoke have of owning any sort of home, never mind the mansions shown here?[/p][/quote]If that was correct then there would be loads of empty houses. Obviously people can afford them because they are being bought. JJ38JJ
  • Score: -5

12:50am Sat 7 Jun 14

Max Headroom says...

JJ38JJ wrote:
Max Headroom wrote:
And with the most basic, run-down two-bedroom homes in Basingstoke starting at £175k, what chance does the average young person in Basingstoke have of owning any sort of home, never mind the mansions shown here?
If that was correct then there would be loads of empty houses. Obviously people can afford them because they are being bought.
Define "people". If you mean buy-to-let landlords and similar people who already own property, then sure. If you mean people who are looking to buy their first property, then that's definitely not the case. Forgive me because I can't find the source anymore, but I remember reading not so long ago that only 4% of first time buyers in the last 12 months were under the age of 30.
[quote][p][bold]JJ38JJ[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Max Headroom[/bold] wrote: And with the most basic, run-down two-bedroom homes in Basingstoke starting at £175k, what chance does the average young person in Basingstoke have of owning any sort of home, never mind the mansions shown here?[/p][/quote]If that was correct then there would be loads of empty houses. Obviously people can afford them because they are being bought.[/p][/quote]Define "people". If you mean buy-to-let landlords and similar people who already own property, then sure. If you mean people who are looking to buy their first property, then that's definitely not the case. Forgive me because I can't find the source anymore, but I remember reading not so long ago that only 4% of first time buyers in the last 12 months were under the age of 30. Max Headroom
  • Score: 9

9:14am Mon 9 Jun 14

Ambivalent says...

Max Headroom wrote:
And with the most basic, run-down two-bedroom homes in Basingstoke starting at £175k, what chance does the average young person in Basingstoke have of owning any sort of home, never mind the mansions shown here?
Two options.

1) Hard Work (for which it is politically incorrect to suggest the owners and prospective owners of these properties have done)

2) Shack up as a couple, bang out kids, get a part time, low income job and let the mugs at 1) pay for you to have a nice social house and live a nice cushty life with Labour voters making out how hard up and vunerable you are.

Interesting comment. What about all the people who are working VERY hard, often long hours, frequently poor working conditions and on a low salary, care workers for example, shop assistants, nursing assistants ... the very people we rely on to look after our elderly and vulnerable and keep our society together ... and contribute to YOUR quality of life. Do they not deserve the opportunity to have somewhere decent to live, somewhere affordable? Or do you see them as just their to serve society, because maybe they didn't have the luck, opportunity, education or options that some of us had?
I think your comments are offensive to a lot of decent people working hard to better their lives, but have the odds stacked against them and I'm sure will continue to have the odds stacked against them while people have the judgmental, patronising and narrow minded views that you appear to hold.
Max Headroom wrote: And with the most basic, run-down two-bedroom homes in Basingstoke starting at £175k, what chance does the average young person in Basingstoke have of owning any sort of home, never mind the mansions shown here? Two options. 1) Hard Work (for which it is politically incorrect to suggest the owners and prospective owners of these properties have done) 2) Shack up as a couple, bang out kids, get a part time, low income job and let the mugs at 1) pay for you to have a nice social house and live a nice cushty life with Labour voters making out how hard up and vunerable you are. Interesting comment. What about all the people who are working VERY hard, often long hours, frequently poor working conditions and on a low salary, care workers for example, shop assistants, nursing assistants ... the very people we rely on to look after our elderly and vulnerable and keep our society together ... and contribute to YOUR quality of life. Do they not deserve the opportunity to have somewhere decent to live, somewhere affordable? Or do you see them as just their to serve society, because maybe they didn't have the luck, opportunity, education or options that some of us had? I think your comments are offensive to a lot of decent people working hard to better their lives, but have the odds stacked against them and I'm sure will continue to have the odds stacked against them while people have the judgmental, patronising and narrow minded views that you appear to hold. Ambivalent
  • Score: 7

12:10pm Mon 9 Jun 14

jonone says...

Ambivalent wrote:
Max Headroom wrote: And with the most basic, run-down two-bedroom homes in Basingstoke starting at £175k, what chance does the average young person in Basingstoke have of owning any sort of home, never mind the mansions shown here? Two options. 1) Hard Work (for which it is politically incorrect to suggest the owners and prospective owners of these properties have done) 2) Shack up as a couple, bang out kids, get a part time, low income job and let the mugs at 1) pay for you to have a nice social house and live a nice cushty life with Labour voters making out how hard up and vunerable you are. Interesting comment. What about all the people who are working VERY hard, often long hours, frequently poor working conditions and on a low salary, care workers for example, shop assistants, nursing assistants ... the very people we rely on to look after our elderly and vulnerable and keep our society together ... and contribute to YOUR quality of life. Do they not deserve the opportunity to have somewhere decent to live, somewhere affordable? Or do you see them as just their to serve society, because maybe they didn't have the luck, opportunity, education or options that some of us had? I think your comments are offensive to a lot of decent people working hard to better their lives, but have the odds stacked against them and I'm sure will continue to have the odds stacked against them while people have the judgmental, patronising and narrow minded views that you appear to hold.
Well, I see your comments as uneducated, equally judgemental and basically clueless about how the real world works.

But I'll remember your comments next time I see the care assistant near me come out of her social rented house. If witnessing her nice car outside, the fact she has 2 kids, pet dogs, Sky TV etc. make me judgemental about her wellbeing, then I'll ensure I keep my eyes closed in future.

Just as I will if I walk past the social hosuing at the end of Popley Way - I'll try and ignore the 14 plate Mercs, BMWs etc parked outside - subsidised housing allowing more money free for a nice car presumably. (Before the inevitable - I have never been able to afford a new car and have made do with what I can afford)

Just as I will if I walk past the poor performing Vyne School and see all the expensive cars, including personalised number plates in the staff car park, just before teachers announce a strike over pay.

A great many people do indeed work **** hard and do not get or have anything like as much as many of the people I have named. I can never understand why people like you do not give one iota of a **** about them?
[quote][p][bold]Ambivalent[/bold] wrote: Max Headroom wrote: And with the most basic, run-down two-bedroom homes in Basingstoke starting at £175k, what chance does the average young person in Basingstoke have of owning any sort of home, never mind the mansions shown here? Two options. 1) Hard Work (for which it is politically incorrect to suggest the owners and prospective owners of these properties have done) 2) Shack up as a couple, bang out kids, get a part time, low income job and let the mugs at 1) pay for you to have a nice social house and live a nice cushty life with Labour voters making out how hard up and vunerable you are. Interesting comment. What about all the people who are working VERY hard, often long hours, frequently poor working conditions and on a low salary, care workers for example, shop assistants, nursing assistants ... the very people we rely on to look after our elderly and vulnerable and keep our society together ... and contribute to YOUR quality of life. Do they not deserve the opportunity to have somewhere decent to live, somewhere affordable? Or do you see them as just their to serve society, because maybe they didn't have the luck, opportunity, education or options that some of us had? I think your comments are offensive to a lot of decent people working hard to better their lives, but have the odds stacked against them and I'm sure will continue to have the odds stacked against them while people have the judgmental, patronising and narrow minded views that you appear to hold.[/p][/quote]Well, I see your comments as uneducated, equally judgemental and basically clueless about how the real world works. But I'll remember your comments next time I see the care assistant near me come out of her social rented house. If witnessing her nice car outside, the fact she has 2 kids, pet dogs, Sky TV etc. make me judgemental about her wellbeing, then I'll ensure I keep my eyes closed in future. Just as I will if I walk past the social hosuing at the end of Popley Way - I'll try and ignore the 14 plate Mercs, BMWs etc parked outside - subsidised housing allowing more money free for a nice car presumably. (Before the inevitable - I have never been able to afford a new car and have made do with what I can afford) Just as I will if I walk past the poor performing Vyne School and see all the expensive cars, including personalised number plates in the staff car park, just before teachers announce a strike over pay. A great many people do indeed work **** hard and do not get or have anything like as much as many of the people I have named. I can never understand why people like you do not give one iota of a **** about them? jonone
  • Score: -1

1:57pm Mon 9 Jun 14

laurence86 says...

Max Headroom wrote:
And with the most basic, run-down two-bedroom homes in Basingstoke starting at £175k, what chance does the average young person in Basingstoke have of owning any sort of home, never mind the mansions shown here?
It seems to me that this “Help” to buy scheme has just inflated the market. People selling will always want to get as much money for their property as possible. The scheme means the same deposit will allow you to borrow twice as much so hence prices have gone up to match. The fact that this scheme is available on houses up to 600K tells you that there is a big problem with the gap between pay and cost of housing. House prices are currently rising by 5.4 per cent a year, whereas at the same time wages are rising 0.9 per cent. So the cost of buying the average home is going up six times as fast as earnings. To put that into context a home buyer needs to find £16,000 more than a year ago, but wages have only risen by £261. Eventually the housing market will pop and leave thousands of people in negative equity unless salaries begin to rise rapidly
[quote][p][bold]Max Headroom[/bold] wrote: And with the most basic, run-down two-bedroom homes in Basingstoke starting at £175k, what chance does the average young person in Basingstoke have of owning any sort of home, never mind the mansions shown here?[/p][/quote]It seems to me that this “Help” to buy scheme has just inflated the market. People selling will always want to get as much money for their property as possible. The scheme means the same deposit will allow you to borrow twice as much so hence prices have gone up to match. The fact that this scheme is available on houses up to 600K tells you that there is a big problem with the gap between pay and cost of housing. House prices are currently rising by 5.4 per cent a year, whereas at the same time wages are rising 0.9 per cent. So the cost of buying the average home is going up six times as fast as earnings. To put that into context a home buyer needs to find £16,000 more than a year ago, but wages have only risen by £261. Eventually the housing market will pop and leave thousands of people in negative equity unless salaries begin to rise rapidly laurence86
  • Score: 2

4:24pm Mon 9 Jun 14

Opinions_opinions says...

It's amazing how many people are quick to have a go at those that can afford these properties. So what if it is new money or old money, the fact is that these houses exist and there are people that are able to buy them. Why is that a problem to some people ? I know if I won the Euro Lottery I would be looking to buy something very similar to those that are shown in the Gazette as I am sure a lot of others would be. There are always going to be those that have more than the rest of us. Why should they be persecuted for that so long as their wealth was earned legally ? Yes there are the bankers that everyone loves to beat up and the very high earners that a lot of people think should pay more tax than the rest of us. But what people don't realise is that those high earners by definition do pay more than all of us anyway. Lets assume there is a flat rate of tax which is 20%. Someone earning 20K would pay £2K in tax. Yet the high earner on 100K would be paying £20K in tax. Why should he be expected to pay even more ? He has already anyway. As it is, the high earners are on 40% + as it is.

We are all able to have a positive effect on our own careers and earning capacity if we are prepared to put the effort in. However most of us will just plod on being a worker bee and for the most part are content with our lives. Others will moan and complain that life isn't fair and the State should do more to take from the richer to give to the poor. Why ? There was nothing stopping the poor from taking control of their own lives. We were all given access to free education, and if we chose to do nothing with that opportunity, we cannot blame anyone else other than ourselves. Having been brought up on Council Estates in West London during my early years with parents that were happy to live off benefits all their lives, I was determined I wanted better for myself and my children. I was fortunate enough to use the education I received to better myself. The same opportunities were given to everyone else and if they chose to ignore that and are now moaning about how unfair it all is, they only have themselves to blame.
It's amazing how many people are quick to have a go at those that can afford these properties. So what if it is new money or old money, the fact is that these houses exist and there are people that are able to buy them. Why is that a problem to some people ? I know if I won the Euro Lottery I would be looking to buy something very similar to those that are shown in the Gazette as I am sure a lot of others would be. There are always going to be those that have more than the rest of us. Why should they be persecuted for that so long as their wealth was earned legally ? Yes there are the bankers that everyone loves to beat up and the very high earners that a lot of people think should pay more tax than the rest of us. But what people don't realise is that those high earners by definition do pay more than all of us anyway. Lets assume there is a flat rate of tax which is 20%. Someone earning 20K would pay £2K in tax. Yet the high earner on 100K would be paying £20K in tax. Why should he be expected to pay even more ? He has already anyway. As it is, the high earners are on 40% + as it is. We are all able to have a positive effect on our own careers and earning capacity if we are prepared to put the effort in. However most of us will just plod on being a worker bee and for the most part are content with our lives. Others will moan and complain that life isn't fair and the State should do more to take from the richer to give to the poor. Why ? There was nothing stopping the poor from taking control of their own lives. We were all given access to free education, and if we chose to do nothing with that opportunity, we cannot blame anyone else other than ourselves. Having been brought up on Council Estates in West London during my early years with parents that were happy to live off benefits all their lives, I was determined I wanted better for myself and my children. I was fortunate enough to use the education I received to better myself. The same opportunities were given to everyone else and if they chose to ignore that and are now moaning about how unfair it all is, they only have themselves to blame. Opinions_opinions
  • Score: 2

9:20am Wed 11 Jun 14

Ambivalent says...

Well, I see your comments as uneducated, equally judgemental and basically clueless about how the real world works.

But I'll remember your comments next time I see the care assistant near me come out of her social rented house. If witnessing her nice car outside, the fact she has 2 kids, pet dogs, Sky TV etc. make me judgemental about her wellbeing, then I'll ensure I keep my eyes closed in future.

Just as I will if I walk past the social hosuing at the end of Popley Way - I'll try and ignore the 14 plate Mercs, BMWs etc parked outside - subsidised housing allowing more money free for a nice car presumably. (Before the inevitable - I have never been able to afford a new car and have made do with what I can afford)

Just as I will if I walk past the poor performing Vyne School and see all the expensive cars, including personalised number plates in the staff car park, just before teachers announce a strike over pay.

A great many people do indeed work **** hard and do not get or have anything like as much as many of the people I have named. I can never understand why people like you do not give one iota of a **** about them?

You really seem to have a problem.
You assume I'm defending people who take advantage of the system, no, I'm talking about a lot of people who are working hard and have little to show for it. People who are doing tough jobs on minimum wage, who can't access social housing (they aren't deemed as 'priority need', who will never afford a mortgage because of the ridiculous cost of housing and who struggle to pay the exorbitant rents most private landlords. People who have little to look forward to in life.
I'm not talking about teachers for god's sake, I don't see them as struggling on a basic wage.
Subsidised housing - do a bit of study - social housing isn't subsidised, most social landlords make a nice profit out of the rents they charge - you're talking about housing benefit, that's not a subsidy for working people in social housing.
Can you tell me that all these flash cars are owned by people on benefits? Can you tell me they are social housing tenants and not people who have bought what once were social houses?
We can all spot the odd person who blags the system, what you appear to refuse to see are the many that don't and are struggling to survive.
Keep watching 'Benefit Street' (that's where you appear to obtain your knowledge and experience) and make sure you keep those blinkers tightly fitted ... you clearly don't want to see the real world as it may contradict your narrow minded and uninformed right wing perceptions!
Well, I see your comments as uneducated, equally judgemental and basically clueless about how the real world works. But I'll remember your comments next time I see the care assistant near me come out of her social rented house. If witnessing her nice car outside, the fact she has 2 kids, pet dogs, Sky TV etc. make me judgemental about her wellbeing, then I'll ensure I keep my eyes closed in future. Just as I will if I walk past the social hosuing at the end of Popley Way - I'll try and ignore the 14 plate Mercs, BMWs etc parked outside - subsidised housing allowing more money free for a nice car presumably. (Before the inevitable - I have never been able to afford a new car and have made do with what I can afford) Just as I will if I walk past the poor performing Vyne School and see all the expensive cars, including personalised number plates in the staff car park, just before teachers announce a strike over pay. A great many people do indeed work **** hard and do not get or have anything like as much as many of the people I have named. I can never understand why people like you do not give one iota of a **** about them? You really seem to have a problem. You assume I'm defending people who take advantage of the system, no, I'm talking about a lot of people who are working hard and have little to show for it. People who are doing tough jobs on minimum wage, who can't access social housing (they aren't deemed as 'priority need', who will never afford a mortgage because of the ridiculous cost of housing and who struggle to pay the exorbitant rents most private landlords. People who have little to look forward to in life. I'm not talking about teachers for god's sake, I don't see them as struggling on a basic wage. Subsidised housing - do a bit of study - social housing isn't subsidised, most social landlords make a nice profit out of the rents they charge - you're talking about housing benefit, that's not a subsidy for working people in social housing. Can you tell me that all these flash cars are owned by people on benefits? Can you tell me they are social housing tenants and not people who have bought what once were social houses? We can all spot the odd person who blags the system, what you appear to refuse to see are the many that don't and are struggling to survive. Keep watching 'Benefit Street' (that's where you appear to obtain your knowledge and experience) and make sure you keep those blinkers tightly fitted ... you clearly don't want to see the real world as it may contradict your narrow minded and uninformed right wing perceptions! Ambivalent
  • Score: 1

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