Consultation period on Basingstoke and Deane Local Plan begins today

Basingstoke Gazette: An artist's impression of how the Manydown site could look An artist's impression of how the Manydown site could look

THE latest round of public consultation on changes to a document that will guide where houses will be built in the borough over the next 15 years is set to open tomorrow.

Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council is inviting residents across the borough to comment on the latest version of the borough’s Local Plan in a public consultation which runs until June 13.

No new housing sites have been added to the draft plan, and councillors from the borough council have decided to stick to a previously-agreed annual housing figure of 748 new homes per year.

The borough council’s development control committee decided to go with the agreed figure of 748 despite a recommendation from council officers to increase the annual figure to 807 new homes per year in January.

Parts of the Local Plan have been revised in response to feedback, including changes to the boundaries and the number of homes that are proposed for the future housing development at Manydown.

The number of homes proposed for the Kennel Farm development, off the A30 Winchester Road, has increased from 250 to 310 homes after Eric Pickles, Secretary of State for Communi-ties and Local Government, over-ruled the wishes of councillors who wanted to reject a planning application from developer Wates.

The allocation of homes to be built on land to the east of Basingstoke, at Old Basing, has also been reduced from 900 to 450 homes.

The Local Plan, which has to be approved by a Government planning inspector, will guide decisions on all future planning applications. It also contains policies on where new homes and business premises will be permitted in addition to policies which will protect existing communities and the countryside.

Over 1,300 comments were made by residents, organisations and groups on Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council’s Local Plan in October last year, when the draft version went out for the first period of public consultation.

For more information on the changes to the Local Plan, visit basingstoke.gov.uk/go/localplan.

Comments (5)

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12:30pm Fri 25 Apr 14

Max Headroom says...

I'm 26, married, and looking to settle down in the Basingstoke area. I'm in a full-time professional job with a decent salary my age, and my wife works in retail. We'd love to buy our own two-bedroom place so we can start a family, but with each day our ambition is getting further and further out of reach.

The average two-bedroom property in somewhere like Popley or Buckskin is currently £175,000. Assuming a 20% deposit which is often asked for for first-time buyers, that's a £35k deposit not including other fees, slightly less than our combined pre-tax annual wage. We don't have the bank of mum & dad available to help us with the deposit, if we wanted that help. We're looking at the prospect of saving for at least 5-7 years for our deposit, not withstanding the matching increase in deposit required with increasing house prices (8% per year). We're also faced with the prospect of not being able to start a family until we're in our mid-to-late 30s.

Yet we're still amongst the lucky ones who have at least a prospect of owning our own home. For a couple who work in retail or any other near-minimum-wage jobs there's absolutely no chance of saving any significant amount of money. Help To Buy, rather than helping people like myself get on the ladder, is instead enabling buyers to pay even more for property, placing further debt on their shoulders, and pushing prices further out of reach of those who don't have their deposit together yet. Copy that across most of the country, and you have an idea of how young adults today feel. Hard work, a core Conservative principle, just isn't good enough any more to be able to put a secure roof over your head.

The fact is we need a way to either a) bring down house prices for existing homes, or b) build a lot more houses. Since option A would put a ton of people in severe negative equity and leave the banks with a horrendous amount of liability I can see why politicians are scared of doing so. Which leaves plan B, more homes. Rather than reducing the scale of developments such as this, the opposite needs to happen.

Of course, that aggravates the NIMBYs to no end, but I ask you this. If your sons and daughters cannot afford to buy their own property by their own means, cannot put roots down in an area, cannot feel a part of a community due to having to move home every couple of years, what sort of future is being created?
I'm 26, married, and looking to settle down in the Basingstoke area. I'm in a full-time professional job with a decent salary my age, and my wife works in retail. We'd love to buy our own two-bedroom place so we can start a family, but with each day our ambition is getting further and further out of reach. The average two-bedroom property in somewhere like Popley or Buckskin is currently £175,000. Assuming a 20% deposit which is often asked for for first-time buyers, that's a £35k deposit not including other fees, slightly less than our combined pre-tax annual wage. We don't have the bank of mum & dad available to help us with the deposit, if we wanted that help. We're looking at the prospect of saving for at least 5-7 years for our deposit, not withstanding the matching increase in deposit required with increasing house prices (8% per year). We're also faced with the prospect of not being able to start a family until we're in our mid-to-late 30s. Yet we're still amongst the lucky ones who have at least a prospect of owning our own home. For a couple who work in retail or any other near-minimum-wage jobs there's absolutely no chance of saving any significant amount of money. Help To Buy, rather than helping people like myself get on the ladder, is instead enabling buyers to pay even more for property, placing further debt on their shoulders, and pushing prices further out of reach of those who don't have their deposit together yet. Copy that across most of the country, and you have an idea of how young adults today feel. Hard work, a core Conservative principle, just isn't good enough any more to be able to put a secure roof over your head. The fact is we need a way to either a) bring down house prices for existing homes, or b) build a lot more houses. Since option A would put a ton of people in severe negative equity and leave the banks with a horrendous amount of liability I can see why politicians are scared of doing so. Which leaves plan B, more homes. Rather than reducing the scale of developments such as this, the opposite needs to happen. Of course, that aggravates the NIMBYs to no end, but I ask you this. If your sons and daughters cannot afford to buy their own property by their own means, cannot put roots down in an area, cannot feel a part of a community due to having to move home every couple of years, what sort of future is being created? Max Headroom
  • Score: 5

4:39pm Fri 25 Apr 14

Sensory says...

Nimbys couldn't care less about you or your family Max. All they care about are nice views.

Shame, because I wasn't lucky enough to be born before 1975 and thus I am similarly unlikely to own a nice (or even rubbish) home.
Nimbys couldn't care less about you or your family Max. All they care about are nice views. Shame, because I wasn't lucky enough to be born before 1975 and thus I am similarly unlikely to own a nice (or even rubbish) home. Sensory
  • Score: 0

1:08pm Sat 26 Apr 14

klorane says...

They plant houses on urban or suburban locations, but don't seem to care about facilities that already exist. I can't find anything in the local plan that addresses the impact on the local area of the building to take place, or alterations to road layouts. Our children have had to live with dust from building works for their whole lives as they will never finish in the town.

With Manydown, there has been a plan cobbled together but no mention of Saxon Wood School just on the outside edge, a school for children with very severe physical disabilities. Just a black hole.

Yes, we need schools, although they are happy to disband existing schools such as Chineham Park School in order to build new ones.

No provision is being made for leisure activities, or rather no promise that there will be green spaces for local residents. No concern for quality of life here because they live in The Candovers!
They plant houses on urban or suburban locations, but don't seem to care about facilities that already exist. I can't find anything in the local plan that addresses the impact on the local area of the building to take place, or alterations to road layouts. Our children have had to live with dust from building works for their whole lives as they will never finish in the town. With Manydown, there has been a plan cobbled together but no mention of Saxon Wood School just on the outside edge, a school for children with very severe physical disabilities. Just a black hole. Yes, we need schools, although they are happy to disband existing schools such as Chineham Park School in order to build new ones. No provision is being made for leisure activities, or rather no promise that there will be green spaces for local residents. No concern for quality of life here because they live in The Candovers! klorane
  • Score: 2

12:13pm Wed 30 Apr 14

jonone says...

"Hard work, a core Conservative principle, just isn't good enough any more to be able to put a secure roof over your head"

That's because Labour flushed that away by paying poor people to breed.

You have no kids, you work full time and your wife works too and you are going to struggle to get onto the housing ladder and pay your own way in society.

Yet, I have near neighbours who have (insofar as I can tell), one part time income, yet can afford 8 children, 2 dogs, 1 cat, 5 cars, Sky TV in multiple rooms, a nice new 4 bed social rented property which they can regularly afford to redecorate.

Sadly, the Left and Labour voters have no problem whatsoever with this scenario.
"Hard work, a core Conservative principle, just isn't good enough any more to be able to put a secure roof over your head" That's because Labour flushed that away by paying poor people to breed. You have no kids, you work full time and your wife works too and you are going to struggle to get onto the housing ladder and pay your own way in society. Yet, I have near neighbours who have (insofar as I can tell), one part time income, yet can afford 8 children, 2 dogs, 1 cat, 5 cars, Sky TV in multiple rooms, a nice new 4 bed social rented property which they can regularly afford to redecorate. Sadly, the Left and Labour voters have no problem whatsoever with this scenario. jonone
  • Score: 5

12:28pm Thu 1 May 14

ChinehamIan says...

Here's my view "NO MORE HOUSES", this area is massively over populated as it is.....end of !
Here's my view "NO MORE HOUSES", this area is massively over populated as it is.....end of ! ChinehamIan
  • Score: 1

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