Motorists stopped by police for not wearing seatbelt are caught on camera

Basingstoke Gazette: Motorists stopped by police for not wearing seatbelt are caught on camera Motorists stopped by police for not wearing seatbelt are caught on camera

EIGHT people were stopped by police in Basingstoke this morning for not wearing a seatbelt while travelling in a vehicle.

The operation was part of a European wide campaign to crackdown on those failing to comply with the seatbelt law. Officers from Hampshire’s Road Policing Unit were positioned at the Thorneycroft Industrial Estate, in Worting Road, next to Morrisons supermarket, from 8am, to catch those in the morning’s rush hour.

Within the first 10 minutes, four people had been pulled over.

Those who were stopped included a driver in a van belonging to D&D NRG plumbing and heating and a passenger in an Anglian windows van.

Those caught were given the option of paying a £100 fine or paying £30 to take part in an online educational course about the dangers of not wearing a seatbelt.

PC Andrew Daw, who was part of the operation, said: “It’s hard to enforce because people don’t see it as impacting on others.”

The majority of those pulled over during the 45 minute operation were van drivers.

Sergeant Barry Long said: “A lot of the vans are a bit older and don’t have the alarms to remind them to put their belt on. But it’s been law since 1983 so there’s no real excuse.

"It’s mainly an educational purpose which is why there’s the option of an online course which is cheaper than the fine. It’s to promote safety – if they don’t have their seatbelt on they are more likely to be seriously injured or killed if they crash, or roll around the vehicle.”

The campaign was launched after research showed that failure to wear a seatbelt is one of the main reasons people die in road crashes.

A recent national roadside survey revealed that on average, five per cent of people do not wear a seatbelt.

Sergeant Rob Heard, Hampshire’s road safety officer, said this put “themselves and others in real danger.”

He added: “There are a few exceptions for people in certain circumstances but for the vast majority it’s essential they belt up to stay safe and avoid a hefty fine. Drivers also need to realise it’s their responsibility to make sure children under 14 wear a seatbelt or use a suitable child restraint.”

Comments (19)

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12:34pm Wed 12 Mar 14

Sam_Walker123456 says...

'EIGHT people were stopped by police in Basingstoke this morning for not wearing a seatbelt while travelling in a vehicle.'
Was the vehicle a bus?
'EIGHT people were stopped by police in Basingstoke this morning for not wearing a seatbelt while travelling in a vehicle.' Was the vehicle a bus? Sam_Walker123456
  • Score: 3

4:26pm Wed 12 Mar 14

JC76 says...

Is the section of road a public or private road? The Road Traffic Act doesnt apply to private roads. From the photos the road looks like the private road on the industrial estate. Just a question.
Is the section of road a public or private road? The Road Traffic Act doesnt apply to private roads. From the photos the road looks like the private road on the industrial estate. Just a question. JC76
  • Score: -10

5:18pm Wed 12 Mar 14

jmwturner says...

Good news that the police have saved these thickos from putting themselves in danger, now how about the police helping to save the rest of us from them.....
For instance, get the ones using their mobiles while driving
Get the ones who knowingly choose the wrong lane when approaching the Winchester road roundabout from Morrisons, going to Brighton Hill, in order to save themselves a few moments. In the case of taxi drivers it is clearly deliberate, they can't pretend that they don't know the road.
Good news that the police have saved these thickos from putting themselves in danger, now how about the police helping to save the rest of us from them..... For instance, get the ones using their mobiles while driving Get the ones who knowingly choose the wrong lane when approaching the Winchester road roundabout from Morrisons, going to Brighton Hill, in order to save themselves a few moments. In the case of taxi drivers it is clearly deliberate, they can't pretend that they don't know the road. jmwturner
  • Score: 26

6:07pm Wed 12 Mar 14

jonone says...

jmwturner wrote:
Good news that the police have saved these thickos from putting themselves in danger, now how about the police helping to save the rest of us from them..... For instance, get the ones using their mobiles while driving Get the ones who knowingly choose the wrong lane when approaching the Winchester road roundabout from Morrisons, going to Brighton Hill, in order to save themselves a few moments. In the case of taxi drivers it is clearly deliberate, they can't pretend that they don't know the road.
Did you not know? Taxi drivers are completely exempt from all elements of the Highway Code and Hampshire Police turn a blind eye. This is another "ooh, look aren't we police good" booster - in reality, the road and motorways in the region remain a lawless Wild West.
[quote][p][bold]jmwturner[/bold] wrote: Good news that the police have saved these thickos from putting themselves in danger, now how about the police helping to save the rest of us from them..... For instance, get the ones using their mobiles while driving Get the ones who knowingly choose the wrong lane when approaching the Winchester road roundabout from Morrisons, going to Brighton Hill, in order to save themselves a few moments. In the case of taxi drivers it is clearly deliberate, they can't pretend that they don't know the road.[/p][/quote]Did you not know? Taxi drivers are completely exempt from all elements of the Highway Code and Hampshire Police turn a blind eye. This is another "ooh, look aren't we police good" booster - in reality, the road and motorways in the region remain a lawless Wild West. jonone
  • Score: -9

10:14pm Wed 12 Mar 14

Folkestone Saint says...

How times have changed, Thornycroft (the lorry manufacturer) used to test their vehicles along that road, which you may think "fair enough", but they had no cab, no engine cover, not even a wind screen, just the chassis, the test drivers had goggles on and most likley not even a proper seat to sit on.
How times have changed, Thornycroft (the lorry manufacturer) used to test their vehicles along that road, which you may think "fair enough", but they had no cab, no engine cover, not even a wind screen, just the chassis, the test drivers had goggles on and most likley not even a proper seat to sit on. Folkestone Saint
  • Score: 4

8:31am Thu 13 Mar 14

JJ38JJ says...

JC76 wrote:
Is the section of road a public or private road? The Road Traffic Act doesnt apply to private roads. From the photos the road looks like the private road on the industrial estate. Just a question.
I passed by whilst it was happening. The drivers were spotted on the public road and then pulled over off the road to avoid causing an obstruction.
[quote][p][bold]JC76[/bold] wrote: Is the section of road a public or private road? The Road Traffic Act doesnt apply to private roads. From the photos the road looks like the private road on the industrial estate. Just a question.[/p][/quote]I passed by whilst it was happening. The drivers were spotted on the public road and then pulled over off the road to avoid causing an obstruction. JJ38JJ
  • Score: 14

9:29am Thu 13 Mar 14

toffeeblock says...

Taking the point above, to "Get the ones who knowingly choose the wrong lane when approaching the Winchester road roundabout from Morrisons, going to Brighton Hill" if you read the highway code you will see this is not an offence; observing lane markings are a "should" not a "must". The bottleneck here would probably benefit from a "use both lanes" marking for turning right anyway. Irrespective of lane markings and other users you may believe to be "in the wrong lane" if you are on the roundabout and move between lanes without indicating and checking you are yourself not following the highway code.
Taking the point above, to "Get the ones who knowingly choose the wrong lane when approaching the Winchester road roundabout from Morrisons, going to Brighton Hill" if you read the highway code you will see this is not an offence; observing lane markings are a "should" not a "must". The bottleneck here would probably benefit from a "use both lanes" marking for turning right anyway. Irrespective of lane markings and other users you may believe to be "in the wrong lane" if you are on the roundabout and move between lanes without indicating and checking you are yourself not following the highway code. toffeeblock
  • Score: -11

9:33am Thu 13 Mar 14

jbee37 says...

Obviously targeting van drivers going to Scewfix, Howden's, Brewers. Yes, could be a private road.
Obviously targeting van drivers going to Scewfix, Howden's, Brewers. Yes, could be a private road. jbee37
  • Score: -9

10:39am Thu 13 Mar 14

Buster Preciation says...

toffeeblock wrote:
Taking the point above, to "Get the ones who knowingly choose the wrong lane when approaching the Winchester road roundabout from Morrisons, going to Brighton Hill" if you read the highway code you will see this is not an offence; observing lane markings are a "should" not a "must". The bottleneck here would probably benefit from a "use both lanes" marking for turning right anyway. Irrespective of lane markings and other users you may believe to be "in the wrong lane" if you are on the roundabout and move between lanes without indicating and checking you are yourself not following the highway code.
Nothing in the Highway Code is an offence - it's a code of practice, not an Act of parliament or regulations issued under an Act. However failure to comply with a code of practice would probably mean you have breached a vague regulation on 'care' or 'attention' or something.
You are incorrect anyway - throughout the Highway Code you will find the phrase "unless signs or markings indicate otherwise". There are very clear signs on all approaches to Winchester Road Roundabout and photographs of them proved very useful to me to prove I was not to blame for an accident I was involved with a couple of years ago.
[quote][p][bold]toffeeblock[/bold] wrote: Taking the point above, to "Get the ones who knowingly choose the wrong lane when approaching the Winchester road roundabout from Morrisons, going to Brighton Hill" if you read the highway code you will see this is not an offence; observing lane markings are a "should" not a "must". The bottleneck here would probably benefit from a "use both lanes" marking for turning right anyway. Irrespective of lane markings and other users you may believe to be "in the wrong lane" if you are on the roundabout and move between lanes without indicating and checking you are yourself not following the highway code.[/p][/quote]Nothing in the Highway Code is an offence - it's a code of practice, not an Act of parliament or regulations issued under an Act. However failure to comply with a code of practice would probably mean you have breached a vague regulation on 'care' or 'attention' or something. You are incorrect anyway - throughout the Highway Code you will find the phrase "unless signs or markings indicate otherwise". There are very clear signs on all approaches to Winchester Road Roundabout and photographs of them proved very useful to me to prove I was not to blame for an accident I was involved with a couple of years ago. Buster Preciation
  • Score: 16

12:39pm Thu 13 Mar 14

toffeeblock says...

In terms of police "getting the ones in the wrong lane" this is unlilely to lead to a police stop / ticket, as this is not in the "MUST/MUST NOT" criteria (as opposed to "SHOULD"). (https://www.gov.uk/
highway-code/introdu
ction) Extract.....
"Many of the rules in The Highway Code are legal requirements, and if you disobey these rules you are committing a criminal offence. You may be fined, given penalty points on your licence or be disqualified from driving. In the most serious cases you may be sent to prison. Such rules are identified by the use of the words ‘MUST/MUST NOT’.

The "SHOULD", as you rightly suggest, may indeed point towards a contributing factor following an accident.

That said, if you change lanes on a roundabout without looking (whether or not the person either side of you approached the roundabout in the wrong lane - intentionally or not) is still not recommended!

At this location all ambiguity could be avoided and a bottleneck improved if both lanes were available to turn right - there's plenty of precedent for this.
In terms of police "getting the ones in the wrong lane" this is unlilely to lead to a police stop / ticket, as this is not in the "MUST/MUST NOT" criteria (as opposed to "SHOULD"). (https://www.gov.uk/ highway-code/introdu ction) Extract..... "Many of the rules in The Highway Code are legal requirements, and if you disobey these rules you are committing a criminal offence. You may be fined, given penalty points on your licence or be disqualified from driving. In the most serious cases you may be sent to prison. Such rules are identified by the use of the words ‘MUST/MUST NOT’. The "SHOULD", as you rightly suggest, may indeed point towards a contributing factor following an accident. That said, if you change lanes on a roundabout without looking (whether or not the person either side of you approached the roundabout in the wrong lane - intentionally or not) is still not recommended! At this location all ambiguity could be avoided and a bottleneck improved if both lanes were available to turn right - there's plenty of precedent for this. toffeeblock
  • Score: 0

2:14pm Thu 13 Mar 14

JJ38JJ says...

How about the drivers in the right hand lane who continue on the ring road? The paths would cross.
How about the drivers in the right hand lane who continue on the ring road? The paths would cross. JJ38JJ
  • Score: 7

3:11pm Thu 13 Mar 14

laurence86 says...

I am rather intrigued as to why a 45 minute police operation to hand out some £30 fines has made the local news. Also are people’s faces and number plates allowed to be shown without their consent? I sometimes get the feeling that a Gazette reporter chances across something going on during their commute and get a bit over excited.
I am rather intrigued as to why a 45 minute police operation to hand out some £30 fines has made the local news. Also are people’s faces and number plates allowed to be shown without their consent? I sometimes get the feeling that a Gazette reporter chances across something going on during their commute and get a bit over excited. laurence86
  • Score: -10

3:15pm Thu 13 Mar 14

toffeeblock says...

Good point that! When it's busy and backed up no-one uses that route but when quieter they may, so one size doesn't fit all I guess.

It does seem that the current layout isn't working when human nature is taken into account - big queue on the right and emply left hand lane and otherwise minimal traffic coming from all other directions. It's gonna happen while this behaviour is not an offence.

Indicating and checking before moving across lanes would certainly minimise clashes with the current layout - you can only drive one car after all and other road users make mistakes (whether intentional or unintentional).

Enjoy some Radio 2 in the queue, be content following the rules, and silently seethe at those who get away with a short cut - what could be more British than that eh?
Good point that! When it's busy and backed up no-one uses that route but when quieter they may, so one size doesn't fit all I guess. It does seem that the current layout isn't working when human nature is taken into account - big queue on the right and emply left hand lane and otherwise minimal traffic coming from all other directions. It's gonna happen while this behaviour is not an offence. Indicating and checking before moving across lanes would certainly minimise clashes with the current layout - you can only drive one car after all and other road users make mistakes (whether intentional or unintentional). Enjoy some Radio 2 in the queue, be content following the rules, and silently seethe at those who get away with a short cut - what could be more British than that eh? toffeeblock
  • Score: 5

8:29am Fri 14 Mar 14

JJ38JJ says...

We've gone a bit off track from the original story. But whilst we are talking about Winchester Road Roundabout perhaps it's time the junction is finally finished and the flyover built. Since the roundabout was put on the ringroad there have been literally thousands of houses built along Winchester Road, right out to the M3. And more are planned.
'Straight ahead' traffic could use the flyover allowing both south-bound sliproad lanes to be used to turn right and both north-bound sliproad lanes to turn left.
We've gone a bit off track from the original story. But whilst we are talking about Winchester Road Roundabout perhaps it's time the junction is finally finished and the flyover built. Since the roundabout was put on the ringroad there have been literally thousands of houses built along Winchester Road, right out to the M3. And more are planned. 'Straight ahead' traffic could use the flyover allowing both south-bound sliproad lanes to be used to turn right and both north-bound sliproad lanes to turn left. JJ38JJ
  • Score: 6

1:21pm Fri 14 Mar 14

jonone says...

JJ38JJ wrote:
We've gone a bit off track from the original story. But whilst we are talking about Winchester Road Roundabout perhaps it's time the junction is finally finished and the flyover built. Since the roundabout was put on the ringroad there have been literally thousands of houses built along Winchester Road, right out to the M3. And more are planned. 'Straight ahead' traffic could use the flyover allowing both south-bound sliproad lanes to be used to turn right and both north-bound sliproad lanes to turn left.
Such things are probably necessary at all main roundabouts in Basingstoke, particularly Black Dam, allowing an "unbroken" route from Ringway East to the M3 and vice versa. A huge bottleneck would be removed - I can't see the proposed "hamburger" actually making much difference. But for Winchester Road and indeed the M3 southbound off slip at J6, simply making both lanes turn right would immediately increase the capacity of the road and reduce queues - for the former, most of the traffic that goes straight on down Ringway uses the left lane anyway. For the latter, most traffic is going up Ringway, so allowing both lanes to be for "Basingstoke" rather than just the righthand one makes perfect sense - the Alton lane can open off to the left as traffic rounds the roundabout.

I look at most roads in Basingstoke and wonder what qualifications and experience you need to be a Hampshire Highways engineer - not a lot seems the answer!
[quote][p][bold]JJ38JJ[/bold] wrote: We've gone a bit off track from the original story. But whilst we are talking about Winchester Road Roundabout perhaps it's time the junction is finally finished and the flyover built. Since the roundabout was put on the ringroad there have been literally thousands of houses built along Winchester Road, right out to the M3. And more are planned. 'Straight ahead' traffic could use the flyover allowing both south-bound sliproad lanes to be used to turn right and both north-bound sliproad lanes to turn left.[/p][/quote]Such things are probably necessary at all main roundabouts in Basingstoke, particularly Black Dam, allowing an "unbroken" route from Ringway East to the M3 and vice versa. A huge bottleneck would be removed - I can't see the proposed "hamburger" actually making much difference. But for Winchester Road and indeed the M3 southbound off slip at J6, simply making both lanes turn right would immediately increase the capacity of the road and reduce queues - for the former, most of the traffic that goes straight on down Ringway uses the left lane anyway. For the latter, most traffic is going up Ringway, so allowing both lanes to be for "Basingstoke" rather than just the righthand one makes perfect sense - the Alton lane can open off to the left as traffic rounds the roundabout. I look at most roads in Basingstoke and wonder what qualifications and experience you need to be a Hampshire Highways engineer - not a lot seems the answer! jonone
  • Score: 1

1:54pm Fri 14 Mar 14

JJ38JJ says...

Actually I think the road layout in Basingstoke is better than most towns of a similar size. Unlike older towns it seems to have planned with the car in mind. What wasn't in mind was how quickly the town would expand and to what extent. So I agree a more holistic approach to town planning would have been better.

I've always thought that the road to Alton should be somehow redirected to junction 6 on the M3 (if it's possible). The current route south is convoluted and requires the use of minor roads.
Actually I think the road layout in Basingstoke is better than most towns of a similar size. Unlike older towns it seems to have planned with the car in mind. What wasn't in mind was how quickly the town would expand and to what extent. So I agree a more holistic approach to town planning would have been better. I've always thought that the road to Alton should be somehow redirected to junction 6 on the M3 (if it's possible). The current route south is convoluted and requires the use of minor roads. JJ38JJ
  • Score: 3

1:42pm Sat 15 Mar 14

jonone says...

JJ38JJ wrote:
Actually I think the road layout in Basingstoke is better than most towns of a similar size. Unlike older towns it seems to have planned with the car in mind. What wasn't in mind was how quickly the town would expand and to what extent. So I agree a more holistic approach to town planning would have been better.

I've always thought that the road to Alton should be somehow redirected to junction 6 on the M3 (if it's possible). The current route south is convoluted and requires the use of minor roads.
Good point there. I think a link road to the A339 and rearrangement of the existing J6 junction would not be too difficult and would result in a reduction in traffic around Ringway South and Black Dam areas.

To be fair, you are right also that the general layout is not that bad, it is some of the detail and road markings that cause unnecessary pinch points.
[quote][p][bold]JJ38JJ[/bold] wrote: Actually I think the road layout in Basingstoke is better than most towns of a similar size. Unlike older towns it seems to have planned with the car in mind. What wasn't in mind was how quickly the town would expand and to what extent. So I agree a more holistic approach to town planning would have been better. I've always thought that the road to Alton should be somehow redirected to junction 6 on the M3 (if it's possible). The current route south is convoluted and requires the use of minor roads.[/p][/quote]Good point there. I think a link road to the A339 and rearrangement of the existing J6 junction would not be too difficult and would result in a reduction in traffic around Ringway South and Black Dam areas. To be fair, you are right also that the general layout is not that bad, it is some of the detail and road markings that cause unnecessary pinch points. jonone
  • Score: 1

5:41pm Wed 19 Mar 14

JoninBasingstoke says...

Great, again we have prevented natural selection!
Great, again we have prevented natural selection! JoninBasingstoke
  • Score: 0

5:44pm Wed 19 Mar 14

JoninBasingstoke says...

toffeeblock wrote:
Taking the point above, to "Get the ones who knowingly choose the wrong lane when approaching the Winchester road roundabout from Morrisons, going to Brighton Hill" if you read the highway code you will see this is not an offence; observing lane markings are a "should" not a "must". The bottleneck here would probably benefit from a "use both lanes" marking for turning right anyway. Irrespective of lane markings and other users you may believe to be "in the wrong lane" if you are on the roundabout and move between lanes without indicating and checking you are yourself not following the highway code.
Interesting; Please can you find and post where it says this in the highway code.
[quote][p][bold]toffeeblock[/bold] wrote: Taking the point above, to "Get the ones who knowingly choose the wrong lane when approaching the Winchester road roundabout from Morrisons, going to Brighton Hill" if you read the highway code you will see this is not an offence; observing lane markings are a "should" not a "must". The bottleneck here would probably benefit from a "use both lanes" marking for turning right anyway. Irrespective of lane markings and other users you may believe to be "in the wrong lane" if you are on the roundabout and move between lanes without indicating and checking you are yourself not following the highway code.[/p][/quote]Interesting; Please can you find and post where it says this in the highway code. JoninBasingstoke
  • Score: 0

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